Crowd-sourced effort shows off beauty of the U.S.

America is a beautifully varied canvas, dotted with swamps, desserts, tundra, rainforests and so much more.

A clever campaign is highlighting that beauty using art. Inspired by the New Deal art projects of the 1930s and ’40s, the See America project is showcasing the nation’s most amazing places. It’s organized by the Creative Action Network and National Parks Conservation Association.

The project encourages artists to submit posters. It’s not a contest, instead it’s an effort to get people excited about the national parks system and other natural resources.

Any artist who submits a design that meets criteria will have their work displayed on the site, seeamericaproject.com. Many of the posters have a classic or retro feel. In addition to posters, there are also mugs, T-shirts and tote bags. Artists keep 40 percent of any sales.

Posters highlighting places from all over the country are available, and can be sorted by state so you can look for your favorite spot. There are about two dozen designs for Washington state, including Olympic and Mount Rainier national parks.

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