Get the lowdown on your treasure at Seattle museum

  • Herald staff
  • Monday, January 28, 2013 8:42pm
  • Life

Do you have any ancient artifacts lying around at your house?

Perhaps a 5,000-year-old stone tool? Or a drinking cup made from a walrus tusk? How about a twined basketry doll made by a Tlingit weaver?

You can learn more about your treasured collector items at the Burke Museum’s 28th annual Artifact ID Day on Feb. 9.

Burke Museum experts will be on hand to give you more information about American Indian, Pacific Island, Asian and Southeast Asian baskets, blankets and cultural artifacts.

There will also be archaeological experts there to provide details on fossils, rocks, minerals and bones.

Beware that Burke’s experts do not give appraisals and do not authenticate items for sale.

Also, the event is quite popular so limit the items you bring in to three.

Artifact ID Day is to be held from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, on the University of Washington campus, at the corner of NE 45th Street and 17th Avenue NE, Seattle.

Artifact ID Day is covered in the cost of admission, which is $10 general, $8 for seniors, and $7.50 for students and youths. Admission is free for children 4 and under, Burke members and UW students, faculty and staff members.

For more information call 206-543-5590 or visit www.burkemuseum.org.

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