Get your digs in with clawed garden gloves

  • By William Hageman, Chicago Tribune
  • Thursday, August 14, 2014 11:54am
  • Life

Planting bulbs or seeds can be a tedious task, with boredom ranking right up there with the physical discomfort one experiences.

That’s why the Honey Badger Garden Gloves are a double blessing — and just in time for fall bulb planting.

First, the glove has hard plastic claws attached to three fingers, which makes digging in the dirt easier and more precise than using a trowel. And second, it makes digging fun. Put on a shirt with dark green and red stripes and a fedora and pretend to be a latter-day Freddy Krueger as you claw your way into the ground, preparing a home for tulip, daffodil or hyacinth bulbs.

The green-and-blue gloves have a suggested retail price of $24.95 per pair (one clawed, one unclawed; the buyer can choose left- or right-hand claws). The gloves come in three sizes, are washable and are designed to last for more than 200 hours of use, says inventor Aaron Ohan. They have a nice snug fit and are made of a stretchy, rubbery fabric that allows for a good grip. And, when not in use outside, the clawed glove can probably give your dog the back scratch of a lifetime.

The gloves can be bought at Amazon (right glove with claws and left gloves with claws) and will be available at www.whateverworks.com in late August.

More in Life

Shrimp and grits, rendered healthful and Italian? We’re in.

This recipe features a sauce made with olive oil, tomatoes and herbs instead of cheese and cream.

UFO at Paine Field playground was left by an artist — not aliens

The flying saucer at community park in Everett is a cosmic attraction.

Chef James Abbott makes Buck’s peanut butter pie at Buck’s American Cafe in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
New Edmonds bakery showcases owner’s mastery of pastry

Desserts are the highlight at Ganache Patisserie and Cafe on Main Street near the theater.

Marysville theater stages Noel Coward’s timeless ‘Blithe Spirit’

The cast and crew at the Red Curtain Arts Center do a fine job with the 1940s British play.

Stringed instruments get workout at Cascade Symphony concert

Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings” is the orchestra’s first concert of the season.

‘Breathe’ ignores all the inspirational movie cliches

It tells the story of a polio patient and his wife who helped change attitudes about the disabled.

Confusing, muddled thriller confounds talented director, cast

“The Snowman,” based on a Scandinavian crime novel, suffers from catastrophic storytelling problems.

Animating Van Gogh paintings proves to be trippy yet flawed

“Loving Vincent” relates the circumstances of the great painter’s death.

Most Read