Google Glass can be useful in travel

Can Google Glass transform the way we travel? Maybe — or it could be the 2014 equivalent of the Microsoft Zune, an iPod competitor that seemed like a good idea at the time. For travelers, Google Glass has some advantages that may elevate it. Among them:

It is hands-free. No fumbling with your camera (or smartphone) and missing that great shot. The 5-megapixel camera and the 720p video can be activated with a voice command, a touch of the finger or even a wink.

It can help explain the world around you. The Field Trip app is helpful in telling you what you’re seeing. It also can read that information to you.

It can direct you to places you want to go. Maps (Google Now), directions (Compass app), restaurant reservations (Open Table and kosher restaurants with Jewish Guide for Glass) are at your fingertip.

It can translate (menus, street signs) with the WordLens app.

It can improve your golf game (Swingbyte app)

It can keep your travel plans straight (TripIt app).

You can do all of these things with your smartphone. Do you need Glass? I claim no special vision, literally or figuratively, but I never thought an iPad was mandatory either — till I had one.

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