Great Plant Pick: Golden Japanese cedar

  • Wednesday, November 28, 2012 10:24pm
  • Life

WHAT: This golden Japanese cedar, Crptomeria japonica Sekkan-Sugi, was introduced to American horticulture about 1970. It’s a visually dominant tree because of its intense color when growth is new in spring and early summer.

WHY PLANT IT: The brilliant foliage, tipped in creamy yellow, shines against a dark green backdrop. It’s also a standout when planted with gray- or blue-needled conifers or purple foliage plants.

WHERE: The golden cedar thrives in full sun to light, open or dappled shade, and only requires occasional watering and very little pruning. It prefers well-drained soil.

SIZE: The conifer will grow to 10 feet high and 4 feet wide after 10 years. The young plant will grow quickly at first and then slow down after a few years and become more dense.

LEARN MORE: www.greatplantpicks.org.

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