How fish wins out over beef in stew

  • By J.M. Hirsch Association Press
  • Thursday, October 31, 2013 10:13pm
  • Life

When fall weather has us hankering for a bowl of warmth, we tend to think of chili and beef stew.

The trouble with both of those delicious options is time. The best versions of each tend to require long simmers to really develop the great and comforting flavors we’re looking for.

That’s fine for a weekend spent in the apple orchard, but hard to squeeze in during the week when kids and errands are competing for our time at the stove.

And that was the inspiration for this delicious seafood stew. It is every bit as rich and flavorful as a good chili or meat-based stew, but cooks up in no time. Unlike beef, which needs a long, low simmer to become tender, seafood prefers to be cooked quickly, otherwise it can toughen up.

There aren’t a whole lot of rules for a recipe such as this. Add or subtract ingredients as you see fit. But do cook the seasonings with the oil and onion first, as described in the recipe. This helps them quickly develop the sort of deep flavors you’d normally get from a much longer cooking time.

Shrimp and haddock stew

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 russet potatoes, diced
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds, lightly crushed (use the back of a spoon)
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 1 8-ounce bottle clam juice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 pound raw, shelled extra-large shrimp
  • 1 pound haddock (or other mild white fish, such as cod or whiting), cut into small chunks
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Salt and ground black pepper

In a large saucepan over medium-high, heat the olive oil. Add the potatoes, onion, garlic, thyme, paprika, red pepper flakes and fennel seeds. Cook, stirring often, until the onion is softened, about 5 minutes.

Add the celery, tomatoes (and any juice in the can), clam juice and water. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to low and cook for 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender.

Add the shrimp and haddock and increase the heat slightly to maintain a simmer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, or just until the shrimp are pink and the haddock flakes easily. Stir in the parsley, dill and lemon juice, then season with salt and pepper.

Makes 8 servings. Per serving: 210 calories; 45 calories from fat (21 percent of total calories); 5 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 120 mg cholesterol; 15 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 24 g protein; 570 mg sodium.

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