How to tour London on the cheap

  • By Rick Steves
  • Thursday, April 18, 2013 5:54pm
  • Life

It was the final day of a two-month trip to Europe.

I was in London with the freedom to do whatever I wanted. So I decided to test my five free London audio tours in a citywide blitz spanning two neighborhoods, one church and two museums.

It ended up being an entertaining and inexpensive day, proving that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to have a fulfilling experience in this pricey city.

In the morning, I bought a one-day, off-peak subway and bus pass (a great deal at about $10) and caught the Tube from my hotel in South Kensington to Westminster.

My walk commenced on Westminster Bridge, featuring fantastic views of the London Eye Ferris wheel and Big Ben.

Whitehall — London’s Pennsylvania Avenue — was as grand as ever. Stretching from Parliament Square to Trafalgar Square, Whitehall is lined with illustrious buildings and evocative monuments.

Wandering past war memorials like the Cenotaph, honoring those who died in World Wars I and II, I noticed that the monuments of London have never looked so good, having been spiffed up for last year’s Olympics.

I ended my walk at Trafalgar Square, a central meeting point, highlighted by the world’s tallest Corinthian column, topped with a statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson.

From here, I strolled along the Strand. Once a high-class riverside promenade, back before the Thames River was tamed with retaining walls, this busy boulevard is now home to theaters and shops.

About 15 minutes later, I reached St. Clement Danes Church, the starting point for my City of London walk. The one-square-mile area known as The City once comprised the original walled town. These days, it’s consumed by the financial district and Christopher Wren churches.

After the Great Fire of 1666 devastated this area, King Charles II turned to Wren to rebuild 51 churches in The City (not all survive).

Of these, Wren’s greatest creation was St. Paul’s Cathedral.

After touring St. Paul’s, I ate lunch at the Counting House, an elegant bank building converted into a fancy pub and popular with neighborhood professionals.

Though not the most penny-pinching place for a midday meal ($20 with beer), I confirmed my feeling that, while there are plenty of cheap-and-cheery modern eateries in London, this is a great spot for a memorable lunch.

From The City, I hopped into a cab to the British Museum, thinking this would save me time. I was wrong. Traffic was slow, and the meter reached 12 pounds (about $15). Lesson learned: I could have gotten there faster with my transit pass.

The British Museum is hands-down my favorite museum in London. This chronicle of Western civilization houses Egyptian mummies, Assyrian lions and a large hall featuring the best parts of the frieze that once ran around the exterior of Athens’ Parthenon.

From the museum, I caught a bus to the British Library. Here, in just two rooms, are the literary treasures of Western civilization, including the Magna Carta, da Vinci’s notebook, Shakespeare’s First Folio and Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.”

Perhaps the best thing about the British Museum and the British Library: They’re free, though donations are appreciated.

Sights closed, brain drained, I hopped the Tube and zipped back to South Kensington for dinner at the Anglesea Arms.

This place is everything a British pub should be: musty paintings, old-timers, dogs wearing Union Jack vests, a long line of tempting beer-tap handles and flower boxes spilling color around picnic tables.

For less than $25, I got a delightful meal with beer, a great value when you consider the high cost of dining in London.

It was an exhilarating day, and not unreasonable for a first-timer to tackle.

Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email rick@ricksteves.com, or write to him c/o P.O. Box 2009, Edmonds, WA 98020.

© 2013 Rick Steves/Tribune Media Services, Inc.

More in Life

Take a closer look: Winter gardens share gifts in subtle way

Go on a neighborhood walk this month to enjoy the seasonal beauty offered by a variety of gardens.

Great Plant Pick: Pinus contorta var. contorta, shore pine

What: Who is not impressed by the beauty and toughness of this… Continue reading

Red wine usually costs more, but you can still find bargains

Here are five good-quality reds that won’t drain your grocery budget.

Beer of the Week: Skull Splitter and Blood of My Enemies

Aesir Meadery of Everett and Whiskey Ridge Brewing of Arlington collaborated to make two braggots.

Jesse Sykes brings her evolving sounds to Cafe Zippy in Everett

She and Phil Wandscher make a return trip to a club that she values for its intimacy.

Compost: It’s what every gardener really wants for Christmas

A pile of decomposed and recycled organic matter is the gardener’s gift that keeps on giving.

Need a centerpiece? Plant paper-whites for December beauty

The white flowering plant brings the garden indoors in winter, even if the bulbs were never outside.

Beer, wine, spirits: Snohomish County booze calendar

Ugly Sweater Party and Canned Food Drive at Whitewall: Marysville’s Whitewall Brewing… Continue reading

Student winners to perform concertos with Mukilteo orchestra

This annual show is a partnership with the Snohomish County Music Teachers Association.

Most Read