Imagine Children’s Museum adds new exhibits

  • By Theresa Goffredo Herald Writer
  • Sunday, October 7, 2012 8:11pm
  • LifeEverett

Everett’s Imagine Children’s Museum has added two new exhibits, one that helps kids learn about energy and another that allows kids to see air in action.

The museum was closed the first week in September for its annual “sparkle and shine” cleanup and fix-up program and during that time, two new exhibits were created, museum executive director Nancy Johnson said.

One of the new exhibits, Energy Tracks, challenges kids to think about the different principles of physics including speed, curves and angles, height, slope and loop shape.

But don’t worry, they are still having fun sending rubber balls down the brightly colored track system.

As it travels, the ball is subjected to principles of physics. Kids can observe how the ball responds and learn more as they respond to questions, such as “Does Height Matter?” or “Does Loop Shape Matter?,” as the ball moves along the track.

Youngsters can construct their own system in the “Build Your Own” segment based on the physics principles they just learned.

The second new exhibit is the Air-Mazing Laboratory — a 14-foot structure made up of more than 135 feet of polycarbonate pipe filled with fast-moving air.

Kids push scarves into the entry box, and the scarves are propelled through the tubing and fly out of one of the exits.

Kids can change the air pathways by moving flappers in built-in diverter boxes.

“The exhibit gives children an engaging and highly interactive experience, which allows them to ‘see’ air move and helps them to build an understanding of air’s properties, power and potential,” said Kristy Kelm, the museum’s communications specialist.

Imagine Children’s Museum is a nonprofit, hands-on activity center where children ages 1 through 12 can playfully learn. The museum has more than 20 hands-on exhibits.

“We are anxious for you to come and play with Air-Mazing and Energy Tracks, both great additions to our hands-on exhibits,” Johnson said.

Imagine Children’s Museum is at 1502 Wall St., Everett. General admission is $9 and $4.50 between 3 and 5 p.m. Thursdays; free for children 12 months and younger. For more information call 425-258-1006 or go to www.ImagineCM.org.

Theresa Goffredo: 425-339-3424; goffredo@heraldnet.com.

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