Katana Sushi in Everett offers fine selection of rolls, nigiri, sashimi

Open about three months, Katana Sushi is a great addition to Everett dining.

The decor in this smallish store-front restaurant is a mix of modern industrial, with its one corrugated-aluminum-covered wall and fireplace surround, and cozy, with its original-looking brick walls and upholstered barrel chairs. Intimate tables of two and four fill one side of the room and a sushi bar, which seats about eight, lines the other.

The day I went with my husband, Tom, we started our meal with the tempura appetizer ($9). It was one of the best I’ve ever had. It was not greasy and the batter was very light. The perfectly cooked zucchini, broccoli, onion rings and sweet potato were soft but not mushy. The two shrimp were delicious. It was served with a tangy and sweet dipping sauce and was substantial enough to share.

Other appetizers included kaiso salad, chilled seaweed assortment ($6), edamame ($3) and chicken karage (Japanese fried chicken) ($8).

Water was served in a bottle for the table and boiling hot tea arrived in handleless Japanese ceramic cups. Note of caution: The cups get and stay VERY hot. Refills of the tea came quickly, and our entire service was very good. Beer options are Sapporo, Kirin and Asahi; there are four wine choices and about 10 sake selections.

The lunch special ($13) was a six-piece spicy tuna roll, a six-piece yellow tail roll, two pieces of an unidentified white fish and miso soup. The tuna rolls had a bite, the yellow tail was mild and the white fish with the rice was good dipped in soy sauce. The miso had a rich, flavorful broth and was served piping hot.

Both the appetizer and the lunch special were presented on wooden trays with small dipping sauce bowls, which were simple yet elegant. It worked well; the sushi rolls are elegant in their design, too.

Katana’s regular menu has a long list of nigiri and sashimi choices. You can try ama-ebi (sweet shrimp), ika (squid) or saba (mackerel), and each is listed with its Japanese name and a translation. Also offered are traditional combinations, like California roll ($6.50,) spider roll ($9.50) and unagi (fresh water eel) roll ($6).

Their specialty sushi rolls are larger and much more complex. At $10 to $18, these include the Deadliest Catch: tuna, crab, seaweed, escalar (butter fish), cucumber, tobiko (flying fish roe) and spicy sauce; and the Phoenix Rising: salmon, scallop, crab, tobiko and avocado.

Our server patiently answered all of our questions and the chef at the bar told us about the fish coming in fresh daily. With the comfortable chairs, the great service and the carefully prepared food, it was a satisfying dining experience.

Katana Sushi

2818 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-512-9361; www.katanasushieverett.com

Specialty: Sushi

Hours: 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 to 10 p.m. Friday; 5 to 10 p.m. Saturday.

Vegetarian: Yes

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