Learn about swamp things at NW Stream Center event

This show about creatures of the black lagoon will not feature campy 1954 film monsters, but there may indeed be some slime involved.

“Creatures of the Black Lagoon,” a presentation of life in a pond from Adopt A Stream Foundation, will feature such stars as aquatic insects, frogs and salamanders on the big screen.

The creatures will be netted from a pond just before the event. Many of the smaller “creatures” will look 10 feet tall with help from a video microscope projector.

“Creatures of the Black Lagoon” will be presented at 7 p.m. Friday at the NW Stream Center, 600 128th St. SE, Everett.

Before the actual show, naturalists Tom Noland and Lori Powlas are going into the “lagoon,” a large pond that was excavated from a parking lot that used to be a wetland next to the Northwest Stream Center Visitors Building.

Powlas said there is a lot going on below the layer of duckweed at the pond’s surface including the growing larvae of our state insect: the dragonfly.

The dragonfly spends up to two years underwater as a larva before emerging as a winged adult. Underwater, dragonfly larvae are known to eat up to 300 mosquito larvae a day, plus tadpoles and even small fish, Powlas said.

This program is enlightening for first-graders to adults. Call 425-316-8592 to reserve a space. Cost is $5 for Adopt A Stream Foundation members, $7 for nonmembers. For more information go to www.streamkeeper.org.

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