Love Southern cooking? Two new cookbooks are for you

  • By Linda Cicero The Miami Herald
  • Friday, April 18, 2014 12:09pm
  • Life

Two new cookbooks take us south of the Mason-Dixon. “The New Southern Table” by Brys Stephens ($21.95) uses traditional Southern ingredients with French, Mediterranean, Asian and Latin techniques. A classic Southern squash dish, for example, is lightened and refreshed with a taste of Provence (see recipe below).

“The Southern Slow Cooker Bible” by Tammy Algood ($24.99) is a down-home primer with 365 recipes and ways to convert your favorites to crock-pot style.

Summer squash and herb gratin

  • 3 pounds zucchini, yellow squash, or a combination
  • 2 to 4 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1 1/4 cups freshly grated Parmesan, divided
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh marjoram
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Cut the squash into 1/4-inch thick rounds, then cut the rounds in half. Place the squash in a colander and generously season with the 2 to 4 teaspoons kosher salt to draw the excess moisture away from the squash.

This is more salt than you would normally season them with for eating. Some of the salt will penetrate, but some will be rinsed off.

Let sit 20 minutes, rinse with cold water, then thoroughly dry with a kitchen towel.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Heat 2 tablespoons of the butter in medium-size skillet over medium heat. When the butter melts, swirl the pan for 2 to 4 minutes, or until the butter is lightly browned.

Add the bread crumbs and cook, stirring constantly, 2 to 4 minutes, or until the bread crumbs are browned. Transfer to a bowl, and stir in ¼ cup of the Parmesan.

Heat the olive oil and remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat.

Add the squash and garlic and cook, stirring often, 6 to 8 minutes, or until the squash is tender and brown in spots.

Remove the pan from the heat, and stir in the remaining 1 cup of Parmesan, the red pepper flakes, marjoram, rosemary, and parsley, and season to taste with black pepper.

Transfer the squash to a shallow gratin dish, top with the Parmesan and breadcrumb mixture, and bake 20 to 30 minutes, or until hot and bubbly. Makes 6 servings.

Source: “The New Southern Table” (Quarry Books)

More in Life

Bob Jepperson’s Wild Love Story

A perfect circle of sounds, pictures and storytelling from the Anacortes author.

‘Shape of Water,’ ‘Big Little Lies’ lead Golden Globe nominations

“The Post” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” also collected a number of nominations.

Still looking for that one special recipe for the holidays?

Columnist Jan Roberts-Dominguez shares her traditional recipes for cheese soup and chocolate sauce.

Mukilteo Police Chief Cheol Kang is known for his people skills

The city’s top cop’s calm demeanor and holistic approach earns him the nickname “Yoda.”

Three posh places to escape this winter in north Puget Sound

Whether it’s wine country, backcountry or the seashore, a relaxing retreat is close at hand.

Getting a glimpse of what’s coming as we age

Everett Public Library reading to help you understand the changes ahead in your elder years.

This author is throwing a virtual party for book lovers

Jennifer Bardsley is hosting a Facebook get-together for young-adult book authors and readers.

Leanne Smiciklas, the friendly lady who served customers of her husband’s Old School Barbeque from a schoolbus parked in front of the Reptile Zoo east of Monroe, has died at 64. (Dan Bates / Herald file)
Without her, beloved BBQ hotspot in Monroe can’t go on

Leanne Smiciklas, who ran the now-closed Old School BBQ along Highway 2 with her husband, died.

Taylor Johnston waters a philodendron at her home on Friday, Dec. 8, 2017 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Three guidebooks to help the novice houseplant gardener

Indoor plants are popular again — and we’re not talking about your grandma’s African violets.

Most Read