Neither children nor teachers fit into neat boxes

Children are not widgets. Sometimes I wish the politicians in charge of education remembered this.

You can take a child whose brain is different and try to cram her into your widget machine, and it won’t work.

That doesn’t mean there is something wrong with the child. That doesn’t mean she is lazy, or has a character deficit. That doesn’t mean the girl’s not capable. She’s just a different type of widget.

Maybe she’s a gizmo.

This isn’t news to parents who have children on IEPs. For the uninitiated, that stands for “Individual Education Plan” and is the legal document that follows children who are receiving special education services. Children with special needs can qualify for an IEP starting at 3 years old, through their local school district.

But for parents of neurotypical children, gizmo and widget crashing can catch you off-guard.

Maybe it’s the first time you see a standardized test smash your artistic, musical child into a bell curve.

Or maybe it comes when you’re at soccer game and realize that your daughter doesn’t care about winning, but she is excited about spending halftime with her friends. Call the widget police; she’ll never make it into college!

As a former teacher, I know that our system treats educators like widgets, too. Washington state will be fully implementing the Common Core State Standards next year, and the new Washington Teacher/Principal Evaluation Project is already here.

You tell me, whom do you think all of that will be easier for, widget-teachers or gizmo-teachers?

When I was teaching third grade in California at a school with a heavy emphasis on standards, I had to teach art on the sly. The only thing my principal cared about was test results.

No wonder we’ve come to a point where children are not allowed to run at recess, where cursive writing gets ditched, and where typical, Mark Twain behavior labels children as future psychopaths.

Maybe if all of us could — shock, gasp, horror — remember that children are children, we could help them better develop the skills we know are needed for success. Passion, curiosity, self-motivation and friendship are what matter in life, not filling in bubbles.

That doesn’t mean I would ever opt my children out of standardized testing. When parents choose to do this, “refusal” is recorded for the student, and the void is treated as “did not meet standards.” That hurts the teacher, the school and home values in your neighborhood. Plus, it gives you less information about your child.

But I am happy to lend my small voice to this clear message: Too much homework is too much homework. Running on the playground is not a crime. Every brain works differently, and I think we could all do a better job of considering the whole child.

Jennifer Bardsley is an Edmonds mom of two and blogs at teachingmybabytoread.com.

More in Life

‘Found’: Author and climber a 20-year veteran of mountain rescue

In her second book, Bree Loewen shares her experiences of volunteering with Seattle Mountain Rescue.

Secret garden: Privacy trees that won’t outgrow a small space

These plants offer some height to block out unwanted sights without taking over your yard.

Stock your winter bookshelf with these animal and nature reads

Four new books cover outdoors topics from butterflies to wolves.

The Shed Players recently released their new album “Our Shingle Most Favorites.”
Listen here: Josh Clauson, The Shed Players release new CDs

This feature is all about Snohomish County’s homegrown talent: locals who make music and record it.

Newfangled cooker isn’t for those with tried and true methods

Columnist Jennifer Bardsley recently succumbed to peer pressure and purchased an Instant Pot.

Now is the time to assess your student’s back-to-school plan

Take a good look at how your kids are managing their new routine, class, teacher(s) and homework.

Author’s talk of birds and clouds kicks off Marysville series

1. Birds and clouds Marysville’s Outdoor Adventure Speakers Series is kicking into… Continue reading

How to shop in the street markets of France

It’s the best way to connect with the nation’s farmers and artisans.

Oprah Winfrey joins ‘60 Minutes’ for 50th anniversary year

The media giant debuts on tonight’s show, reporting on a story about America’s political divisions.

Most Read