New book chronicles ‘Early Monroe’

Monroe, proudly named after the fifth president of the United States (and because the Postal Service demanded one-word names), became a city with the coming of the railroad in 1893.

Before that “Park Place” was just a ragtag outpost of settlers, lumbermen and farmers, in the fertile river valley.

Monroe’s colorful past is chronicled in Washington native Dexter Taylor’s book, “Early Monroe.”

Taylor will give a presentation on his book and talk about the city’s history at the Monroe Historical Society’s membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Monroe Fire Station, 163 Village Court.

Taylor combed through hundreds of photos, distilling them down to about 250 for the book, and researching each one for background information.

The event is free and open to the public and the evening begins with refreshments and the book-signing at 6:30 p.m. The program begins at 7 p.m.

Copies of “Early Monroe,” which lists at $21.99, will be for sale.

For more information, call 360-217-7223 or go to www.monroehistoricalsociety.org.

Herald staff

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