No worries for Lloyd’s of London on ‘Bigfoot Bounty’

  • By Patrick Kevin Day Los Angeles Times
  • Thursday, December 5, 2013 2:59pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

OK, enough with the grainy footage, the first-person accounts and questionable evidence. Spike TV is looking to get to the bottom of this whole Bigfoot mystery once and for all with its next reality competition series, “10 Million Dollar Bigfoot Bounty.”

Not surprisingly, the series, which premieres Jan. 10, hasn’t attracted a whole lot of what you would call studious, academic types. Instead, you get a whole lot of angry, sexist rednecks yelling at each other in the woods. What better way to attract a notoriously camera-shy, quite probably mythical creature, than to have a bunch of people arguing in the woods?

But it makes for watchable TV.

Dean Cain hosts the show, which claims to offer the biggest cash prize in TV history. Though prize underwriters Lloyd’s of London probably aren’t losing much sleep over this one.

The conditions for winning are definitive visual and DNA proof of Bigfoot’s existence.

Two scientific experts will be on hand for the series: an anthropologist at New York University’s molecular primatology lab and a primatology expert.

According to Spike, DNA evidence will be processed using a mobile DNA lab. If no definitive proof is found, the group that presented the “most compelling evidence and theory” will be awarded a $100,000 research grant to keep searching.

The series is just the latest in Hollywood’s recent preoccupation with Bigfoot. As the Los Angeles Times wrote last year, Bigfoot has been the subject of Animal Planet’s series “Finding Bigfoot,” the “iCarly” episode “iBelieve in Bigfoot,” a horror film called “Exists” from “Blair Witch Project” director Eduardo Sanchez and the documentary film “Sasquatch: The Quest.”

Any chance that $10 million prize will actually get awarded? Keep dreaming, Bigfoot lovers.

More in Life

Marysville theater stages Noel Coward’s timeless ‘Blithe Spirit’

The cast and crew at the Red Curtain Arts Center do a fine job with the 1940s British play.

Stringed instruments get workout at Cascade Symphony concert

Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings” is the orchestra’s first concert of the season.

Animating Van Gogh paintings proves to be trippy yet flawed

“Loving Vincent” relates the circumstances of the great painter’s death.

Confusing, muddled thriller confounds talented director, cast

“The Snowman,” based on a Scandinavian crime novel, suffers from catastrophic storytelling problems.

‘Breathe’ ignores all the inspirational movie cliches

It tells the story of a polio patient and his wife who helped change attitudes about the disabled.

New Edmonds bakery showcases owner’s mastery of pastry

Desserts are the highlight at Ganache Patisserie and Cafe on Main Street near the theater.

What you’ll see Thursday night on Everett, Edmonds art walks

Third Thursday evenings in Everett and Edmonds offer chances for interesting strolls.… Continue reading

Fur & Feathers: 4 lovable dogs need homes

Meet Lola, Sadie, Scooter and Chance

Shrimp and grits, rendered healthful and Italian? We’re in.

This recipe features a sauce made with olive oil, tomatoes and herbs instead of cheese and cream.

Most Read