One last shot at small-batch kraut

  • By Judyrae Kruse Herald Columnist
  • Thursday, October 11, 2012 2:29pm
  • Life

Here’s our last sauerkraut recipe, and it comes to us courtesy of Everett krautmaker Dee Herdt.

“This is a recipe that I got from a cookbook I bought in 1947,” she says. “I have made it many times. I freeze it, but I think it would keep a long time if sealed and refrigerated. If you freeze it, do not fill jars too full as they will break. I’ve found the hotter the weather is, the better sour flavor it will have.”

Sauerkraut in glass jars

Shave cabbage very fine. It takes about 2 pounds of cabbage to fill a 1-quart jar. Fill jar with cabbage, pressing down until about half full. Add 2 teaspoons salt if you are using a 2-quart jar, 1 teaspoon for a 1-quart jar. Fill with remaining cabbage to shoulder of jar, pressing down well. Add salt as before. Then fill jar with cold water to overflowing. Adjust cover loosely. Let stand at room temperature. As water evaporates, fill up each day for 9 days. Then screw cover tight and store in refrigerator for future use.

Heads up, Forum folks: Longtime helper-outer Carol Wilson of Everett writes, “When I sent in the instructions for poached eggs (which appeared in the Sept. 10 Forum), I forgot to say to cover the cup with a saucer while cooking. I’ve never made the eggs without the saucer, but will try it and see how it works. Cooking eggs this way has worked great.”

Now, in case you missed her slick trick, here it is again. Carol said, “Here is a quick tip that my sister Margaret Eichenberger sent to me.

“I have always had a problem cooking poached eggs. Seemed like they were either undercooked or overcooked. She told me to take a miscrowave-safe coffee mug, fill it half-full of water and drop in an egg. Cook in the microwave on high for 40 to 60 seconds.

“It took me several times to get the timing just right for my microwave, but now I have a perfect poached egg in 60 seconds.”

SOS: Mukilteo reader Susan Davison tells us, “My Desert King fig tree has just been amazing this year! It has produced more figs than one person can deal with. Besides jam and jelly, does anyone have some good recipes to share that use figs? My fridge is full! Also, can figs be frozen?”

If you can help Susan with some fig recipes or fig-freezing advice or suggestions, don’t hesitate to send them along to Judyrae Kruse at the Forum, c/o The Herald, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206. Please remember that all letters and e-mail must include a name, complete address with ZIP code and telephone number with area code. No exceptions and sorry, but no response to e-mail by return e-mail; send to kruse@heraldnet.com.

The next Forum will appear in Monday’s Good Life section.

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