Oregon trails will thrill mountain bike riders

  • By Mark Morical The Bulletin
  • Friday, May 10, 2013 10:32am
  • LifeSports

SISTERS, Ore. — Every time I make the trip to the Peterson Ridge Trail system I end up wondering why I don’t ride there more often.

There is just something about Peterson Ridge that makes it a pure joy each time.

Maybe it’s the spectacular views of the Three Sisters or just the fact that the Peterson Ridge Trail system is a sweet network of singletrack built by devoted volunteer mountain bikers from the Sisters Trail Alliance and the Central Oregon Trail Alliance.

Put simply, they knew what they were doing.

Once merely a lone 10-mile trail with a small loop on the south end, the Peterson Ridge Trail network near Sisters, about 30 minutes from Bend, has in the past few years evolved into a vast network of trails to entice mountain bikers of any skill level.

The system now includes 30 miles of expertly designed singletrack and myriad loop options.

Spring and fall are the best times of year to ride at Peterson Ridge, as some of the trails become dusty in the summertime.

The trail network in Sisters consists basically of two main trails — Peterson Ridge Trail West and Peterson Ridge Trail East — with about a dozen connecting smaller trails.

The network is well-marked with signs on nearly every trail connector. (The trailhead kiosk is usually stuffed with detailed maps that show every numbered junction.)

My friend Dustin Gouker and I decided to ride the west trail up the ridge and the east trail back down for a ride of about 14 miles and a duration of 2 hours, 20 minutes.

The trail starts out flat and easy, and the west trail becomes increasingly dynamic as it climbs the ridge. As we climbed higher, the trail became a bit more steep and noticeably more technical, with sections of lava rock.

Most of the trails in the Peterson Ridge area are not technically demanding or particularly strenuous. We decided to try a section of trail called Eagle Rock, which was built to provide a more technical option to those who seek out that style of riding. The trail climbs a rocky mound (Eagle Rock) and then descends the other side.

A short but challenging climb took us to the top of Eagle Rock, from where the snowy Three Sisters glistened against a bright blue spring sky. We rode down the rock-strewn trail, walking our bikes in some of the more challenging sections, back to the west trail.

Peterson Ridge Trail West includes ridgeline riding with still more majestic views of Middle Sister and North Sister.

We rode to the middle overlook along the ridge, finding some rocks on which to sit and take a much-needed break while gazing at the Cascade peaks.

We could have continued another few miles to the far overlook at the south end of the trail network, but we were more than ready for some downhill riding.

We took the connector from the middle overlook and rode to Peterson Ridge Trail East. We followed it through open sagebrush and back down into the ponderosa pine forest.

The east trail features a section of banked corners and up-and-down dips through an old canal, an incredibly fun section that displays the forethought and ingenuity of the volunteers who built the trail.

After that section, the trail steepened, and we cruised back down along the smooth, rhythmic path to the trailhead in seemingly no time.

A perk of Peterson Ridge: Three Creeks Brewing Co. in Sisters and their chicken bacon tater.

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