Pair of Jacks — White, Johnson — playing area shows

  • By Andy Rathbun Herald Writer
  • Wednesday, August 20, 2014 2:13pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

Jack White was wearing the black hat earlier this year.

A Rolling Stone cover story made some small waves after White took a few potshots at the Black Keys — musical rivals also based in Nashville — and expressed frustration with his former White Stripes sidekick and ex-wife Meg White.

Oh well. These things happen. White can bear a little bad press.

After all, the guy, who is playing a pair of sold-out shows at the Paramount Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, wins only praise for his music.

His sound, a gritty garage take on blues rock, has helped establish him as arguably his generation’s greatest guitarist. He’s touring now behind his second album, “Lazaretto,” another four-star album that, like his solo debut “Blunderbuss,” debuted at No. 1.

Tickets are sold-out but can be found at a mark-up at stubhub.com.

Jack Johnson, meanwhile, will headline the Gorge Amphitheatre at 6:30 p.m. Saturday.

The Hawaiian singer, a former professional surfer, has turned into a remarkably enduring performer, winning fans with a laidback and tuneful sound that easily appeals.

Though his biggest hits came early in his career with tracks like “Flake” and “Upside Down,” his albums remain successful even without chart-smashing singles. His latest, “From Here to Now to You,” debuted at No. 1.

Tickets are $57 to $78.90 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

On this side of the mountains, the Eagles are coming to the Tacoma Dome for a career-spanning show at 8 p.m. Monday.

The aging California group dominated the charts in the 1970s with a steady stream of hits, including No. 1 singles “One of These Nights,” “Hotel California” and “Heartache Tonight.” Other songs have grown in fame years after their release, like the heartsick ode “Desperado.”

Expect to hear all of the group’s best-loved songs on this tour, billed grandly as the History of the Eagles.

Tickets are $53.34 to $210.85 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Finally, a string of shows at the Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery will keep crowds coming to Woodinville from Friday through Sunday.

First up is the Gipsy Kings, the well-loved flamenco-based pop group from southern France. The group has remained a force for a quarter of a century thanks to songs like “Volare,” which topped the Latin charts in 1990.

The group is touring now in celebration of its 25th anniversary. They play the winery at 7 Friday night.

Fans can expect to hear old hits as well as newer songs from the band’s 2013 release, “Savor Flamenco,” which, like past releases, included a hodgepodge of World music flavors, including bossa nova, samba and jazz.

Tickets are $52.80 to $84.05 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Then, Earth, Wind &Fire hit the winery at 7 p.m. Saturday for a sold-out show.

Arguably the most popular funk band of the 1970s, the group won fans over with tracks like “Shining Star” and “September.” The act, led by songwriter Maurice White and singer Philip Bailey, remained a potent force through the 1990s.

While White no longer tours with the group — he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease more than a decade ago — Bailey remains on stage.

Tickets are sold-out but can be found at a mark-up at stubhub.com.

Finally, Peter Frampton’s Guitar Circus will play the Chateau Ste. Michelle at 7 p.m. Sunday.

The iconic guitarist sold millions of albums in the 1970s and established himself as a leading live act with his album “Frampton Comes Alive!” and hit singles including “Baby, I Love Your Way.”

Tickets are $61 to $91.70 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

More in Life

Marysville theater stages Noel Coward’s timeless ‘Blithe Spirit’

The cast and crew at the Red Curtain Arts Center do a fine job with the 1940s British play.

Stringed instruments get workout at Cascade Symphony concert

Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings” is the orchestra’s first concert of the season.

Animating Van Gogh paintings proves to be trippy yet flawed

“Loving Vincent” relates the circumstances of the great painter’s death.

Confusing, muddled thriller confounds talented director, cast

“The Snowman,” based on a Scandinavian crime novel, suffers from catastrophic storytelling problems.

‘Breathe’ ignores all the inspirational movie cliches

It tells the story of a polio patient and his wife who helped change attitudes about the disabled.

New Edmonds bakery showcases owner’s mastery of pastry

Desserts are the highlight at Ganache Patisserie and Cafe on Main Street near the theater.

What you’ll see Thursday night on Everett, Edmonds art walks

Third Thursday evenings in Everett and Edmonds offer chances for interesting strolls.… Continue reading

Fur & Feathers: 4 lovable dogs need homes

Meet Lola, Sadie, Scooter and Chance

British Film Institute strips Harvey Weinstein of highest honor

He was awarded a BFI Fellowship in 2002 for his contribution to British cinema.

Most Read