Pasta may not be as bad as you thought

  • By Barbara Quinn The Monterey County Herald
  • Monday, April 28, 2014 6:11pm
  • Life

Nutritionally speaking, here are some facts about spaghetti and other types of pasta.

Historically, almost every country in the world touts some variation of pasta: noodles made with flour dough.

Italians however, are given credit for the name “pasta” which is thought to be derived from the Italian word for “paste.”

Is there any redeeming nutritional value to pasta? For one, it’s made with semolina flour which is ground from durum flour, a high-protein wheat.

In fact, an average serving of spaghetti or other pasta (1 cup) contains as much total protein as 1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish.

Whole grain pasta can provide a good chunk of our daily dietary fiber requirements.

And carbohydrates in pasta also provide fuel to power our brains, nerves and muscles for those long days on the range.

Because pasta is made from wheat, it is also on the “do not eat” list for people with celiac disease. These folks need to avoid barley and rye grains as well.

Gluten — a protein in these grains — can cause severe damage to the digestive tract of people who are genetically intolerant to gluten.

So what can gluten-sensitive people eat? Pretty much anything that does not contain wheat, rye or barley. That includes rice, corn, fresh meat, fish, poultry, fish, milk, beans, fruits and vegetables.

Barbara Quinn is a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula.

More in Life

Beer and cupcakes: Snohomish brewer, baker form unlikely duo

Pacific Northwest Cupcakes uses SnoTown’s brews to make beer-infused sweet treats.

The art and science of weathervanes

They told the direction of the wind and aided in forecasting the, well, weather.

Hundreds of ways to pamper your home and yourself

Find fancy fridges to sparkling jewelry under one roof at home and gift shows in Everett.

This is exactly how a cleaning expert organizes her space in 20 minutes

Try these realistic and attainable tricks to land yourself a cleaner home.

Snohomish brewer flavors beer with chilies from mom’s back yard

Beer of the Week: Smoked rye forms sturdy foundation for SnoTown’s well-balanced Loose Rooster.

Fall is just another blooming season

October can be a time of spectacular colors in your garden.

Woodward Canyon Winery continues to weave masterpieces

Owner Rick Small uses grapes from vines he used when he made wine in his back yard in the 1970s.

Great Plant Pick: Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diabolo,’ purple-leaf ninebark

Grow it with shrub roses and perennials, and it combines with with ornamental grasses.

Beer, wine, spirits: Snohomish County booze calendar

Dash to Diamond Knot: Flying Unicorn Racing is teaming up with Mukilteo’s… Continue reading

Most Read