Plant Pick: Siberian cypress

  • Tuesday, March 25, 2014 4:25pm
  • Life

WHAT: The Siberian cypress also called a Russian juniper. is a choice, low-growing evergreen that thrives in the Northwest. Its delicate, lacy foliage sits in graceful layers, Each branch tip turns slightly down, adding a touch of elegance.

WHY PLANT IT: Siberian cypress offers year-round interest. During the growing season, Siberian cypress is bright green, but with the onset of cold weather its foliage changes to earth-toned purple-brown.

Little pruning is needed to maintain its form. Hard pruning can ruin its lovely layered habit.

WHERE: Siberian cypress is among the few conifers that tolerate shade. It is also useful for slope plantings, growing vigorously and covering large areas.

Although it is not a true juniper or a true cypress, it has similar, scalelike needles.

It grows well in full sun to dappled shade and part shade. It needs a well-drained or sandy soil and will not tolerate waterlogged sites or clay.

SIZE: Siberian cypress grows to about 2-feet wide by 8-feet high at maturity.

Source: www.greatplantpicks.org

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