Plants of Merit

  • Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:29pm
  • Life

WHAT: The rose Sally Holmes produces enormous clusters of ivory, apricot and white blooms, giving the appearance of a bouquet on a stem.

Highly rated by the American Rose Society, it is a hybrid musk with a mild sweet fragrance.

A tall, breathtaking plant with a long blooming season, it is nearly thornless.

Sally Holmes won the Portland Gold Medal in 1993, the Glasgow Fragrance Award in 1993 and the British Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit in the same year.

It is no surprise that this rose has been referred to as one of the truly great roses of all time and deserves a place of distinction in the residential garden.

SUN OR SHADE: This rose can tolerate some shade but requires several hours of full sun.

SIZE: Although it is advertised as 6- to 8 feet, Sally Holmes easily reaches 12 feet in our mild Pacific Northwest climate. Its width is approximately 6 feet.

This rose can either be grown as a climber, espaliered along a fence, woven through a pergola or trimmed to the size of a tall shrub.

SEE IT: At the WSU Master Gardener Demonstration Garden at Jennings Memorial Park, 6915 Armar Road, Marysville.

Sandra Schumacher

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