Schilling on ‘‘Orange,’’ new indie film

  • By Nicole Evatt Associated Press
  • Sunday, March 23, 2014 6:31pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

When Taylor Schilling arrives on the set of “Orange Is the New Black,” her make-under begins.

“We all come into work and we get our makeup taken off. The woman who does my makeup … I’m just now realizing her tricks. I think she spends time with me like just with the brush with nothing on my face to make it feel like she’s doing something,” Schilling joked in an interview Monday.

The popular Netflix original series follows Schilling’s character, Piper Chapman, as she adjusts to life in a women’s correctional facility. Before the hit show’s second season debuts June 6, fans can catch her out of the orange jumpsuit in the new indie drama “Stay.”

AP: You spent about a month filming “Stay” with Aidan Quinn on the west coast of Ireland. What was that like?

Schilling: Just incredible. I mean I know him as Aidan Quinn from ‘Legends of the Fall,’ you know, a very fancy actor man. And he was such a pleasure to work with and so talented. And also it was so fun to be with him in his home turf of Ireland where … they love him so much. And it’s such a treat to see Ireland through his eyes.

AP: What can you tell us about the new season of “Orange Is the New Black”?

Schilling: We go deeper into characters, and it encompasses more of the Litchfield prison community so you get to know more of the ladies a little bit more in depth. So it’s sort of everything that’s so great about season one, but more.

AP: Your father was a prosecutor. What does he think of the show?

Schilling: I just was visiting with him a couple weeks ago and I don’t think I really realized how closely related what he does and what I’m doing are until just recently. And now he works in drug courts in Massachusetts with moving juveniles who are brought up on drug-related charges to alternatives to incarceration … which is so incredibly important and kind of underlies the story of what we’re seeing in ‘Orange Is the New Black.’ That these are all people. Someone is not their crime and you can do bad things and not be a bad person. And to kind of unpeel what’s going on behind getting put behind bars — the lack of education, the poverty, domestic violence, mental health issues, drug abuse.

AP: What did a Golden Globe nomination for the role mean to you?

Schilling: It’s like some kind of dream come true to feel that validated and seen in this way. … It feels like a stamp of approval from the community a little bit. Like, ‘We see you. You’re doing well.’ OK. So I should keep on being an actor. Nice. Like it feels like that you’re moving in the right direction. … Left up to my own devices I could be like ‘yeah right, it’s time for a left turn. It’s time to become a nurse.’

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