Shock-rocker sticks to his shtick

  • By Andy Rathbun Herald Writer
  • Wednesday, February 6, 2013 7:48pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

Hey, remember Marilyn Manson, the chart-topping shock-rocker who stirred up so much trouble in the mid-1990s? Geez, whatever happened to that lug nut?

Oh, it looks like he’s still doing his thing: Manson will bring his enduring brand of shock rock to the Showbox SoDo at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Somewhat amazingly, Manson has become an elder statesman of his scene, managing to hold onto his fanbase by sticking to a tried-and-true formula of angsty, button-pushing rock. His latest album, “Born Villain,” debuted at No. 10 on the Billboard 200 in May.

Admittedly, the SoDo isn’t as big as the arenas he once headlined, but still, it seems Manson isn’t going away anytime soon.

Tickets are sold out, but can be found at marked-up prices at stubhub.com.

The indie-rock favorites Ra Ra Riot haven’t hit the top of the charts yet, but they just might, one day.

The New York based group, which will play the Neptune Theatre at 9 p.m. Friday, has seen each of its past albums land at a higher spot on the charts, as its burgeoning fan base has been won over by the group’s charms.

Ra Ra Riot is coming to Seattle as it tours behind its third and most recent album, “Beta Love,” another collection of chamber-pop-inflected indie rock that was released in January by Seattle’s Barsuk Records.

Tickets are $18.50 at stgpresents.org or 877-784-4849.

Hot Water Music has been around the block a few more times than Ra Ra Riot.

The hardcore group first formed in 1994, and has split up and then got back together at least twice before.

The band didn’t release an album from 2004 to 2012, breaking its eight-year silence last year with the release of “Exister.” Like past releases, the album was defined in part by the endearing roughness of its lead singer, Chuck Ragan.

During the group’s gap in record releases, Hot Water Music still found time to tour — arguably, its bread and butter. Hot Water Music now is heading to the Showbox at the Market at 7 p.m. Sunday.

Tickets are $21.50 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849.

The reformed super group Tomahawk will hit the same venue later that week, playing the Showbox at 8 p.m. Tuesday.

Tomahawk features members of the Jesus Lizard, Faith No More, Battles and Mr. Bungle. The group has released an album every three or four years since its 2001 debut, with its latest record, “Oddfellows,” reaching stores last month.

Tickets are $25 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849.

And, finally, Soundgarden will wrap up its hometown stand at the Paramount Theatre with another sold-out show at 8 p.m. Friday.

The group is touring behind “King Animal,” its first new album in 16 years.

Though sold-out, tickets to the concert can be found at a markup at stubhub.com.

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