Summer Meltdown returns for 14th year and focus on mudslide relief

Summer Meltdown Festival producer Josh Clauson grew up east of Arlington.

The festival supports efforts to help the upper North Fork Stillaguamish River valley communities since the tragic March 22 landslide.

In addition, festival organizers said they are trying to remain a positive economic force in the area by proceeding with plans to put on the festival, scheduled for Aug. 7 through 10 at the Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheatre, otherwise known as the Darrington Bluegrass Festival grounds on Highway 530, west of Darrington.

The names of bands playing at the 14th annual Meltdown have been announced.

They include STRFKR, Lord Huron, Nahko &Medicine for the People, Black Joe Lewis, Neon Indian, Five Alarm Funk, Ill-Esha, Acorn Project and the True Spokes.

Tickets for Meltdown include four days and nights of on-site camping and unlimited access to all performances. The Meltdown features a crafty Kids Village and discounted event tickets for the youngest concert goers.

“We hope people will return to the festival this year to celebrate life and bring light in a transformational time for our communities,” a festival spokesman said in a statement.

More information is at summermeltdownfest.com.

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