Take a walk at the darkest time of the year

  • Herald staff
  • Thursday, December 12, 2013 6:10pm
  • Life

The winter solstice, the darkest time of the year, will be celebrated with lots of light at the famed Kruckeberg Botanic Garden, just over the county line in Shoreline.

The garden’s foundation offers its free Solstice Stroll from 4:30 to 9 p.m. Friday and Dec. 21 at the garden, 20312 15th Ave. NW, Shoreline.

The foundation will light up the garden with luminaries, glowing sculptures and twinkling lights. People are encouraged to stop by for a walk through the garden, enjoy warm beverages and cookies, and glow sticks for the kids.

Artist Cynthia Knox worked with volunteers to create art for the Solstice Stroll.

“The Kruckeberg Botanic Garden is a rare gem,” said Knox in a statement. “I am looking forward to seeing it glow.”

Knox has created a stand of giant flowers, a miniature hobbit hive and a scattering of delicate frilly orbs in the forest setting. The entry will be lined with luminaries made by children.

Donations to help fund the event are encouraged. Parking is available on-site and at nearby Syre Elementary School. Signs will direct drivers who use the overflow parking at the school.

The garden was founded in 1958 by Arthur and Mareen Kruckeberg. More information is at www.kruckeberg.org.

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