Tamara Tunie takes a break from ‘SVU’

  • By Rob Owen Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 3:48pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

PASADENA, Calif. — Tamara Tunie (“Law &Order: Special Victims Unit”) stars in Sundance Channel’s “The Red Road” (Feb. 27).

Despite a career that’s included TV (“As the World Turns”) and producing a Broadway hit (“Spring Awakening”), “The Red Road” marks Tunie’s first time starring in a TV series from its start. And she made her first trip to the Television Critics Association press tour to discuss why this role held particular appeal.

“The Red Road” is a dramatic thriller about a sheriff in a town outside New York City and the neighboring, federally unrecognized American Indian tribe.

Tunie plays the mother of a tribe member (Jason Momoa, “Game of Thrones”) who returns home just in time to get caught up in intrigue.

“I wanted to grab a hold of that character and play that role,” Tunie said. “Her ancestry is very similar to my own. I have Native American blood, African blood, European blood. For the first time, a role was presented to me that completely embraced my entire DNA makeup, and I was very excited about being able to embrace that part of my heritage and portray it on screen.”

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