Tartlets are tiny, tasty and easy

  • By J.M. Hirsch Associated Press
  • Friday, March 22, 2013 1:09pm
  • Life

Easter dinner isn’t generally the sort of meal we try to rush. The whole point is to savor the meal, not sprint through it the way we do most weeknights.

But that doesn’t mean we don’t appreciate the easy, time-saving trick here and there.

In this case, I’ve applied the same technique to both the appetizer and the dessert. It’s an approach that frees me up to focus on the rest of the meal: the glazed ham, the roasted vegetables, perhaps a cocktail.

The trick begins with purchased frozen phyllo pastry cups (also called “fillo shells”). You’ll find them in the grocer’s freezer section alongside the puff pastry (and often near the frozen fruit).

These tiny cups (each holds about 1 tablespoon or so of fillings and they usually come 15 to a box) come fully cooked and thaw in minutes. All you need to do is fill them and eat them (though you may need to bake them depending on your filling).

For the dessert, I went with a ridiculously easy and delicious no-cook option: creamy lemon-berry tartlets.

These are so simple you could delegate this to the kids.

Creamy lemon-berry tartlets

  • 1/2 cup creme fraiche
  • 2 tablespoons purchased lemon curd
  • Pinch cinnamon
  • 15 frozen baked phyllo cups
  • 1 cup fresh berries
  • Powdered sugar, to sprinkle

In a small bowl, whisk together the creme fraiche, lemon curd and cinnamon until slightly thickened. Spoon 1 to 2 teaspoons of the mixture into each phyllo cup. The filling should be lightly mounded in the cups, but not overflowing.

Top each cup with several berries, then arrange the cups on a serving platter. Spoon powdered sugar into a mesh strainer, then hold it over the filled cups and gently tap to dust with sugar.

Makes 15 tartlets. Per serving: 50 calories; 35 calories from fat (70 percent of total calories); 4 g fat (2.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 15 mg cholesterol; 4 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 1 g protein; 25 mg sodium.

For the appetizer, we don’t even need a recipe. All I do is transform the classic Easter quiche into bite-size treats.

To do this, heat the oven to 400 degrees. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray, then arrange the phyllo cups on it.

Fill each cup with a small amount (1 to 2 teaspoons) of fillings. Chopped cooked meats, chopped vegetables and shredded cheese are great choices.

In a 1-cup liquid measuring cup, whisk 1 egg, a splash of water, milk or cream, and a bit of salt and pepper.

Carefully pour about 1 teaspoon of the egg mixture over the fillings in each cup. Bake for about 10 minutes, or until the egg is puffed and the fillings are lightly browned.

That’s it. The quiche cups can be served warm or at room temperature.

More in Life

Shrimp and grits, rendered healthful and Italian? We’re in.

This recipe features a sauce made with olive oil, tomatoes and herbs instead of cheese and cream.

UFO at Paine Field playground was left by an artist — not aliens

The flying saucer at community park in Everett is a cosmic attraction.

Chef James Abbott makes Buck’s peanut butter pie at Buck’s American Cafe in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Fur & Feathers: 4 lovable dogs need homes

Meet Lola, Sadie, Scooter and Chance

Sweet baking tips: How to rescue brown sugar that’s turned hard

Soften the rock solid stuff, then try this recipe for chocolate chunk cookies with sea salt.

Valentina Bogdanova, 74, loves working in the gardens that nearly surround the Bakerview Apartments, where she has lived for 20 years. The units are among 16 affordable and subsidized properties leased to seniors by the Everett Housing Authority. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
As real estate booms, those with fixed-incomes need help

When senior citizens get housing, they are able to ‘age in place.’

Melania Trump to donate inaugural ball gown to Smithsonian

Melania Trump is donating her inaugural ball gown… Continue reading

Harry Potter exhibit marks 20th anniversary of first book

Many of the things Harry Potter fans thought were imaginary were actually based in fact — or folklore.

Visiting Germany’s Lutherland, birthplace of Reformation

The sights include the church where the first Protestant service took place in 1521.

Most Read