Today in History

  • Monday, June 9, 2014 7:21pm
  • Life

Today is Tuesday, June 10, the 161st day of 2014. There are 204 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 10, 1964, the Senate voted to limit further debate on a proposed civil rights bill, shutting off a filibuster by Southern senators. (The Civil Rights Act of 1964 went on to win congressional approval and was signed by President Lyndon Johnson.)

On this date:

In 1692, the first official execution resulting from the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts took place as Bridget Bishop was hanged.

In 1864, the Confederate Congress authorized military service for men between the ages of 17 and 70.

In 1907, eleven men in five cars set out from the French embassy in Beijing on a race to Paris. (Prince Scipione Borghese of Italy was the first to arrive in the French capital two months later.)

In 1921, President Warren G. Harding signed into law the Budget and Accounting Act, which created the Bureau of the Budget and the General Accounting Office.

In 1934, English composer Frederick Delius, 72, died in Grez-sur-Loing, France.

In 1940, Italy declared war on France and Britain; Canada declared war on Italy.

In 1942, during World War II, German forces massacred 173 male residents of Lidice, Czechoslovakia, in retaliation for the killing of Nazi official Reinhard Heydrich.

In 1944, German forces massacred 642 residents of the French village of Oradour-sur-Glane.

In 1967, the Middle East War ended as Israel and Syria agreed to observe a United Nations-mediated cease-fire.

In 1971, President Richard M. Nixon lifted a two-decades-old trade embargo on China.

In 1985, socialite Claus von Bulow was acquitted by a jury in Providence, Rhode Island, at his retrial on charges he’d tried to murder his heiress wife, Martha “Sunny” von Bulow.

In 1994, the action thriller “Speed,” starring Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper and Sandra Bullock, was released by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.

Ten years ago: Singer-musician Ray Charles, known for such hits as “What’d I Say,” “Georgia on My Mind” and “I Can’t Stop Loving You,” died in Beverly Hills, California, at age 73.

Five years ago: James von Brunn, an 88-year-old white supremacist, opened fire in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., killing security guard Stephen T. Johns. (Von Brunn died at a North Carolina hospital in January 2010 while awaiting trial.) Donald Trump fired Miss California USA Carrie Prejean, who’d sparked controversy when she said gays shouldn’t be allowed to marry, citing contract violations.

One year ago: Jury selection began in Sanford, Florida, in the trial of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, charged with second-degeee murder in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. (Zimmerman was acquitted.)

Associated Press

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