Today in History

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 2:19pm
  • Life

Today is Saturday, April 5, the 95th day of 2014. There are 270 days left in the year.

Today’s highlight:

On April 5, 1614, Pocahontas, Indian Chief Powhatan’s daughter, married Englishman John Rolfe in the Virginia Colony. (A convert to Christianity, Pocahontas had adopted the name “Rebecca” when she was baptized.)

On this date:

In 1614, England’s King James I convened the second Parliament of his rule; the “Addled Parliament,” as it came to be known, lasted only two months.

In 1621, the Mayflower sailed from Plymouth Colony in present-day Massachusetts on a monthlong return trip to England.

In 1764, Britain’s Parliament passed The American Revenue Act of 1764, also known as The Sugar Act.

In 1864, Ben Field and George M. Pullman received a U.S. patent for an “improvement in (rail) sleeping-cars” that consisted of a folding upper berth.

In 1895, Oscar Wilde lost his criminal libel case against the Marquess of Queensberry, who’d accused the writer of homosexual practices.

In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order creating the Civilian Conservation Corps and an anti-hoarding order that effectively prohibited private ownership of gold.

In 1951, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were sentenced to death following their conviction in New York on charges of conspiring to commit espionage for the Soviet Union.

In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Federal Communications Commission v. American Broadcasting Co., Inc., unanimously ruled that TV quiz shows did not violate lottery laws.

In 1964, Army General Douglas MacArthur died in Washington at age 84.

In 1974, Stephen King’s first published novel, “Carrie,” was released by Doubleday.

In 1986, two American servicemen and a Turkish woman were killed in the bombing of a West Berlin discotheque, an incident which prompted a U.S. air raid on Libya more than a week later.

In 2010, an explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine near Charleston, W.Va., killed 29 workers.

Associated Press

More in Life

Beer of the Week: Scuttlebutt’s Night Circus

The Everett brewery’s head brewer had nightmares trying to dial in its new coffee and coconut ale.

Viognier: French white grape gaining foothold in Washington

Viognier, the noble white grape of the northern Rhône Valley of France,… Continue reading

Curries continues home-cooked Indian cuisine at new location

The restaurant, now located on Evergreen Way, also puts an Indian spin on Northwest cooking.

New documentary chronicles Obama’s last year in White House

“The Final Year” doesn’t paint the administration in rosy colors, but it isn’t too critical either.

‘Forever My Girl’ takes a page from the Nicholas Sparks genre

The film based on a novel by Heidi McLaughlin is a well-worn tale of lost love and redemption.

Christian Bale seems to channel Clint Eastwood in ‘Hostiles’

Bale plays a U.S. cavalry captain who escorts a dying Cheyenne chief to his tribal homeland.

International guitar tour led by Lulo Reinhardt stops in Edmonds

International Guitar Night, now in its 18th year, is Jan. 24 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts.

The latest on Snohomish County’s breweries, wineries and distilleries.

recreated one of those old recipes, brewing Tennant’s 1954 Gold Label Barleywine

New Cascadia Art Museum exhibit showcases mid-century designs

The exhibition includes ceramics, furniture, clothing, sculpture and jewelry from 1948 to 1966.

Most Read