Try a cider brine for a more flavorful turkey

  • By Alison Ladman Associated Press
  • Monday, November 12, 2012 11:08pm
  • Life

If you are going to go to the (admittedly little) trouble of brining your Thanksgiving turkey, be sure to set the bar higher than simply adding moisture. This also is a great opportunity to add plenty of flavor.

The flavor of this brine ends up being at once subtly sweet, but also boldly savory. And that is a combination that makes the meat a perfect partner for all the classic Thanksgiving sides.

Cider-brined turkey and sage gravy

For the turkey:

112- to 14-pound turkey

1/2gallon apple cider

1/2cup kosher salt

1/2cup packed brown sugar

1/2cup minced fresh sage

1tablespoon crushed black peppercorns

For the gravy:

1/4cup white wine

2cups low-sodium chicken or turkey broth

3tablespoons instant flour, such as Wondra

3tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage

Salt and ground black pepper

Place a 2 1/2-gallon zip-close plastic bag upright in a large bowl. Place the turkey in the bowl, then pour in the cider, salt, brown sugar, sage and peppercorns. Seal the bag, squeezing out the air. Massage the bag to mix the ingredients. Refrigerate and let brine work for a minimum of 8 hours, turning the turkey now and again.

When ready to roast, heat the oven to 350 F. Fit a roasting pan with a rack.

Remove the turkey from the brine and discard the brine. Pat the turkey dry, then set it onto the roasting rack. Roast for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, or until the temperature of the breast reaches 160 degrees and the thighs reach 170 degrees. If the turkey darkens too much, cover it loosely with foil.

Transfer the turkey to a serving platter, wrap with foil, then set a couple layer of bath towels over it to keep it warm.

Remove the rack from the roasting pan. Place the roasting pan over medium heat on the stovetop (you may need two burners) and bring the juices to a simmer. Add the wine and scrape up any browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Pour the broth into the pan, whisking continuously. Add the flour and whisk to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes, while continuing to stir. Season with sage, salt and black pepper.

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