Tulip festival and more best bets for the weekend

Tulips: The fields should be stunning this weekend, so it would be a good time for a trip up to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival. Read about it in our story here.

Live music The Hootenanny will play today’s current country hits, leaving the classics behind. Hometown Hootenanny presents “On the Radio,” a tribute to country music on Saturday at the Historic Everett Theatre. Read about it in our story here.

On the stage: “Giselle” will be presented at 5 p.m. Sunday at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. “Giselle,” one of the greatest romantic tragedies in ballet, is being staged by two artistic directors who were both Pacific Northwest Ballet leading artists. Also, the leading male dancer was just promoted to principal dancer at PNB. Read more in our story here.

Carving show: The Quil Ceda Carvers present a show this weekend at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds. The show offers a wide variety of carvings to admire or buy, including masks, totem poles, carousel figurines and clocks. There are also woodcarving demonstrations, classes, a juried show and door prizes. Everyone who attends receives a carving goodie bag. The show is 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Donation of $5 requested; children under 12 free.

For spring: The spring version of Kla Ha Ya Days is this weekend. Activities include a street fair on Saturday and Sunday in Snohomish. There will be a chili cook-off Saturday and a barbecue competition Sunday with public sampling each day. There will also be entertainment, a carnival and a beer garden. For more information go to www.klahayadays.com.

Go to tea: The Marysville Historical Society’s Spring Tea and Vintage Fashion Show is from 12:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Tulalip Resort Hotel. Admission is by registration only. Seats are $25 each. The best way to register at this late date is to call Ken Cage, historical society president, at 425-308-8707 or society treasurer Meg Engelter at 425-314-3706.

Make flowers: Kids and teens ages 9 and up can make beautiful and intricate crepe paper flowers on Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Everett Public Library Evergreen branch. Each participant will receive supplies for three flowers, limited to first 25 children. Get more information here.

Learn about crows: Corvid expert and professor John Marzluff will talk about his 2012 book “Gifts of the Crow.” Marzluff says that crows and other corvids have large brains, which allow them to have complex emotions, think, plan, and reconsider their actions. The event is at 2 p.m. at the Everett Public Library main branch. Get more information here.

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