Weekend fun: Winter walk, science, soup and more

Winter Walk: Take a guided walk on Saturday at Camano Island State Park. Meet at the picnic shelter near the boat ramp at 9:50 a.m. The walk includes two short climbs but is otherwise mostly level. The trail is 2.6 miles long with views of Saratoga Passage and Elger Bay. It also passes through a beautiful fern grotto and ravine. Rain or shine — walks are only canceled for extreme wind or snow. Wear sturdy shoes and weather-appropriate clothing. Get more info here.

E-easy: If you’re still trying to figure out that new Kindle, tablet or other e-book reader, fear not. The Snohomish Library is offering a session Saturday on borrowing free e-books from the Sno-Isle Libraries. Bring your library card, email information and your charged device. Call 360-568-2898 or go to www.sno-isle.org to register for the 9 to 9:45 a.m. session. You can also schedule an appointment for one-on-one instruction. The library is at 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish.

Resolve: Prepare to succeed at your New Year’s resolutions. Life coach Debbie Lacy offers the help you need to succeed from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Mukilteo Library, 4675 Harbour Pointe Blvd. Lacy offers methods you can use on your own, journaling exercises and a discussion. Call 425-493-8202 for more information.

Very scientific:Two Sno-Isle libraries are offering science activities for kids Saturday.

  • Dr. Owl’s Silly Science investigates the power of air at 11 a.m. at the Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St.; call 360-658-5000.
  • A Pacific Science Center program, Volts and Jolts, sparks things up from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Monroe Library, 1070 Village Way; call 360-794-7851.

More soup, please? Kelly Morrow, a Bastyr University registered dietitian, will show you how easy it is to make healthful and hearty soups from 11 a.m. to noon Saturday at Molbak’s Nursery, 13625 NE 175th St., Woodinville. Call 425-483-5000 with questions or click here.

Favorite things: Scattered seats may be available for Von Trapp wannabes at the “Sing-a-Long-a-Sound of Music” at the 5th Avenue Theatre in Seattle with two shows, 1:30 and 7 p.m. Saturday, and at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. The movie will be shown on a big screen with subtitles to the lyrics. Arrive in costume and you may win a prize. Get more info here.

Dance: See the MossyBack Morris Men dance at 2 p.m. Sunday at Everett Public Library, 2702 Hoyt Ave. The dance team performs an energetic style of traditional English folk dance.

More in Life

Bob Jepperson’s Wild Love Story

A perfect circle of sounds, pictures and storytelling from the Anacortes author.

‘Shape of Water,’ ‘Big Little Lies’ lead Golden Globe nominations

“The Post” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” also collected a number of nominations.

Everett’s Michael ‘Scooby’ Silva is the leader of the (dog) pack

Since 2012, he’s built a thriving business walking dogs while their owners are at work.

Mukilteo Police Chief Cheol Kang is known for his people skills

The city’s top cop’s calm demeanor and holistic approach earns him the nickname “Yoda.”

Three posh places to escape this winter in north Puget Sound

Whether it’s wine country, backcountry or the seashore, a relaxing retreat is close at hand.

Getting a glimpse of what’s coming as we age

Everett Public Library reading to help you understand the changes ahead in your elder years.

This author is throwing a virtual party for book lovers

Jennifer Bardsley is hosting a Facebook get-together for young-adult book authors and readers.

Leanne Smiciklas, the friendly lady who served customers of her husband’s Old School Barbeque from a schoolbus parked in front of the Reptile Zoo east of Monroe, has died at 64. (Dan Bates / Herald file)
Without her, beloved BBQ hotspot in Monroe can’t go on

Leanne Smiciklas, who ran the now-closed Old School BBQ along Highway 2 with her husband, died.

Taylor Johnston waters a philodendron at her home on Friday, Dec. 8, 2017 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Three guidebooks to help the novice houseplant gardener

Indoor plants are popular again — and we’re not talking about your grandma’s African violets.

Most Read