What’s on Ron’s bookshelf?

  • Wed Nov 14th, 2012 2:45pm
  • Life

by <a href="http://areadinglife.com/author/raverill/" target="_blank">Ron</a>, Everett Public Library staff

Today we answer that age-old question, What’s on Ron’s Bookshelf? Some people take too much food at a meal because their eyes are bigger than their stomach. I check out far more books than I can actually read because I want to look important and smart.

Rather than tell you about each of the books, I will tell you why they ended up on my bookshelf. If you’re interested in further details click on a link to go to the library’s catalog, which is chalk full of information about each title.

So, without further ado, here’s what’s on Ron’s bookshelf.

The Iron Wyrm Affair by Lilith Saintcrow

I enjoyed Saintcrow’s series about Jill Kismet, exorcist and demon slayer, not a read that would typically interest me. If Saintcrow can engage me in a topic I don’t care about, then The Iron Wyrm Affair, a novel of Victorian steampunk, should be a shoo-in.

The Map of Time by Felix J. Palma

A review of The Map of the Sky by the same author made reference to this first book in the series. Upon further investigation I discovered a mix of time travel, H. G. Wells and Jack the Ripper, and seriously, what more can a fellow ask for?

Scorch by Gina Damico

A glowing review lead me to Croak, the first book in this trilogy (Scorch is second) about grim reapers, their jobs and living conditions. Funny and touching, exciting and poignant. Hoping for more of the same in this follow-up.

Five Novels of the 1940s &50s by David Goodis

Recently I’ve developed a strong interest in pulp and noir. Goodis is an author I’d not heard of before and I ran across him in research. The stories in this collection are reputed to be superior examples of the genre.

The Doomsday Vault by Steven Harper

Victorian England, a plague, zombies, clockwork automatons, pirates…

Guys &Dolls: The Stories of Damon Runyon by Damon Runyon

No one else uses language or creates a bygone time like Runyon. It is a delight to experience his prose, characters and unforgettable stories.

So You Created a Wormhole: A Time Traveler’s Guide to Time Travel by Phil Hornshaw

This humorous look at the science behind time travel theory provides heady knowledge as well as entertainment. And gossip about Einstein.

False Negative by Joseph Koenig

Recently the Hard Case Crime series has re-released older pulp/noir classics as well as new or unpublished stories. The recently-penned False Negative is the first book by this critically acclaimed author in 20 years.

Death Warmed Over: Dan Shamble, Zombie P.I. by Kevin J. Anderson

This is a book I found whilst browsing. Why did I choose it? Three words: Zombie. P. I.

How to Sharpen Pencils by David Rees

I encountered this book in a review and its quirky humor appealed to me. Little did I know that it is perhaps the funniest book in existence. The dry text takes an exhaustive and authoritative look at the artisanal craft of pencil sharpening. You will never need another book on the subject.

The Diviners by Libba Bray

I recently finished Beauty Queens by Libba Bray, a humorous look at beauty pageants, and it was one of the more entertaining books I’ve read in some time. The Diviners looks like an entirely different beast, focusing on occult-based murders in 1926.

The Janus Affair by Pip Ballantine

Ballantine’s first book, Phoenix Rising, was one of my favorite’s of 2011. It’s a rip-roaring, dynamite ‘splodin’, secret agent whirlwind set in a steampunk Victorian England. I have eagerly awaited the sequel.

So now you know what’s on my bookshelf. Feel free to share your own bookshelf denizens with me. Perhaps we can get together to discuss some titles once I’m done building my time machine.

Be sure to visit A Reading Life for more reviews and news of all things happening at the Everett Public Library