What’s that white bird? Learn how to tell

Trumpeter swans, tundra swans and snow geese — you might joke that they all look alike.

But here’s your chance to learn to tell them apart and to learn lots of other interesting facts about these big white birds that blanket the local winter farmlands like sheets of snow.

Biologist Martha Jordan will present a lecture and beautiful slide show on these “White Birds of Winter” Jan. 24 at the Northwest Stream Center.

Jordan will walk visitors through bird identification and help you become an expert on spotting the different bird types while you are out admiring their beauty. You will also be able to obtain a useful swan identification pamphlet.

These white birds come down to Washington state by the thousands from Alaska and Canada to visit the local farm fields. Jordan will also help steer you to areas where you can see these birds this time of year.

Jordan, who leads the Washington State Stewards, an affiliate of the Trumpeter Swan Society, gears her lecture to middle school students and adults. The Washington Science Teachers Association also offers clock hours to teachers who attend this event.

Jordan’s talks cover a variety of topics, from identification to life history of the birds to the latest controversies involving lead poisoning and habitat destruction.

Jordan laces her talks with personal tales: She serves as a surrogate “mom” to baby trumpeter swans so she has a lot of stories to share about these experiences.

“White Birds of Winter” starts at 7 p.m. Jan. 24 at the NW Stream Center at McColluim Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. Cost is $5 for Adopt A Stream Foundation members and $7 for nonmembers.

Registration is required by calling 425-316-8592. For more information go to the Adopt A Stream Foundation’s website at www.streamkeeper.org.

More in Life

Ice queen: Local women’s hockey team founder is fearless

Leslie Tidball’s fearless competitive spirit keeps her going strong in ice hockey at 64 years old.

Sarita Viramontiz attempts a start off the blocks during an open house at the Granite Curling Club Sunday night in Seattle on February 18, 2018. (Kevin Clark / The Daily Herald)
Granite Curling Club hosts open houses to teach the Olympic sport

With the 2018 Winter Games wrapping up, the club expects its informal classes to fill up quickly.

How to entice a wide range of winged friends to your yard

A Tulalip Bay couple shares how they encourage birds, bees and butterflies to visit their garden.

You can bird-proof your home to prevent window deaths

Studies estimate that billions of birds die after crashing into glass in the U.S. each year.

American horror: What can we do to prevent mass murder?

There isn’t a single cause or a single solution for deathly shootings like the one in Florida.

Making chores fun: Clean up the kitchen in five easy steps

“Zone cleaning” is to do one step at a time, which means that chores aren’t overwhelming.

Discovering the romance of Germany’s Black Forest

Avoid the tourist traps and immerse yourself in the region’s charming countryside.

Growing up: Some plants go through changes not unlike puberty

Arborvitae, junipers, spruce and pines, for example, exhibit juvenile and adult characteristics.

Decorated ceramic pig bares famous Wemyss Ware trademark

Very early flower-decorated pigs from Wemyss Ware have auctioned for over $30,000.

Most Read