Wow the guests with cranberry chutney

  • By Elizabeth Karmel Associated Press
  • Friday, November 9, 2012 1:48pm
  • Life

One of the many things I love about Thanksgiving is the continuity of the menu across generations and regions.

Sure, every family and region has its own interpretation of the staples. But it is simply amazing to me that on one day, so many Americans, regardless of background, sit down to roughly the same meal — turkey, gravy, cranberry sauce, dressing (if you’re in the South, stuffing if you’re in the North), some sort of potato and a healthy dose of pie.

One of my favorite parts of Thanksgiving — aside from basically everything — is the cranberry sauce.

It is one of the very first recipes I developed many years ago when I was supervising the public relations side of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line.

I called it a cranberry chutney instead of a sauce because it is so thick with fruit, spices and a touch of vinegar. It is good enough to eat off a spoon.

And here’s one tip, regardless of which recipe you use. Getting the sauce to thicken and take on the right consistency requires that the cranberries simmer for at least 10 minutes. That is how long it takes to release the pectin — the natural jelling ingredient — from the fruit. As long as you cook it for long enough for the cranberries to pop, you should be good.

Cranberry chutney with port

212-ounce bags fresh cranberries, washed and picked through

Zest and juice of 1 large orange (about 1/2cup of juice)

1tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1cup port wine

1cup sugar

1cup dried Turkish apricots, cut into strips

1cup dried cherries

Pinch salt

1/4teaspoon nutmeg

1/4teaspoon ground cloves

1teaspoon cinnamon

In a large, heavy pot, combine the cranberries, orange zest and juice, balsamic vinegar, port and sugar. Bring to low boil, then reduce heat to simmer. Add the apricots, cherries and salt.

Making sure the cranberries don’t burn, continue cooking over a low-medium heat, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes, or until the cranberries start to pop. Add the nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon, then stir well to combine. Continue cooking on low until thick, about another 5 to 7 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings, if necessary.

Makes 16 servings. Per serving: 130 calories; 0 calories from fat (0 percent of total calories); 0 g fat (0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 29 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 23 g sugar; 1 g protein; 20 mg sodium.

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