5 finalists chosen for Everett School Board seat

EVERETT — The Everett School Board has selected five finalists as candidates to replace Jessica Olson, who resigned earlier this month.

The finalists include Traci Mitchell and Kristine Petereit, who earlier applied for the opening created by the resignation in December of Jeff Russell, former school board president. The board chose Caroline Mason to replace Russell.

Mitchell manages pharmacy services and infection control at Valley General Hospital in Monroe. She is vice president of the executive board of the Everett Public Schools Foundation and is a PTA volunteer at Gateway Middle School. She has a master’s degree in health care administration from the University of Washington.

Petereit is fund development coordinator at the Dawson Place Child Advocacy Center. She has a bachelor’s degree in social science from the University of Washington, is co-president of the James Monroe Elementary Parent Teacher Association and has served on the board of the Everett Public Schools Foundation.

The other three finalists are:

Arletha Northrop, who works as a paralegal at an Everett law firm and has a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Washington. Her husband is a teacher in the Everett School District.

Michelle Black, who previously worked as a 911 dispatcher and has a bachelor’s degree in both physics and computer science from Western Washington University. She now works for an environmental consulting firm in Seattle.

Daniel Mills, an attorney for Everett’s Woodstone Industries, who began his career as a high school English teacher in the Renton School District. Mills’ law degree is from Seattle University.

The school board selected the finalists during a meeting Friday afternoon. Olson’s replacement will serve the remaining two years of her term.

The school board will make its choice on which of the finalists will be appointed to Olson’s seat during a meeting on Feb. 3. It will include interviews with each candidate.

Two other people applied but were not selected as finalists:

Zachary Anders, a Jackson High School graduate who is a reporter for the Mill Creek View newspaper. Anders was appointed to Mill Creek’s Arts &Beautification Board last year.

Rodman Reynolds, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for the school board last fall. Reynolds was one of seven people who applied to be appointed to Russell’s seat but was not selected as one of the five finalists for that appointment, either.

Reynolds previously attempted to launch a recall last year against the school board for failing to have an audit committee, as required by law. A Snohomish County Superior Court judge turned down the request.

During his campaign for school board. Reynolds said he was a proponent of open government and would like to see the school board’s six-year terms reduced to four years.

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

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