Amanda Knox won’t willingly return to Italy

SEATTLE — Amanda Knox said Friday she will fight the reinstated guilty verdict against her and an ex-boyfriend in the 2007 slaying of a British roommate in Italy and vowed to “never go willingly” to face her fate in that country’s judicial system.

“I’m going to fight this to the very end,” she said in an interview with Robin Roberts on ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

Knox said she has written a letter to the family of her slain British roommate, Meredith Kercher, expressing sympathy for the legal ordeal that continues more than six years after she was stabbed and sexually assaulted.

“I want them to know I understand this is incredibly difficult. They also have been on this never-ending thing. When the case has been messed up so much, a verdict is no longer a consolation for them,” Knox said during Friday’s interview.

“And just the very fact that they don’t know what happened is horrible,” Knox said.

“They deserve respect and the consolation of some kind of acknowledgement,” she said. “I really wish them the best.”

Kercher’s sister Stephanie and brother Lyle were in the courtroom in Florence for the Thursday’s verdict.

“It’s hard to feel anything at the moment because we know it will go to a further appeal,” Lyle Kercher said. “No matter what the verdict was, it never was going to be a case of celebrating anything.”

Knox’s former boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, has been prohibited from leaving Italy while the case continues.

“I don’t know what I would do if they imprisoned him. It’s maddening,” Knox told GMA.

And she is not ready for the possibility she could be extradited to Italy to serve a 28-year prison sentence.

“This really, it hit me like a train. I didn’t expect this to happen. I really expected so much better from the Italian system. They found me innocent before, how could they say beyond a reasonable doubt,” Knox told GMA.

During the trial, Knox, 26, remained in Seattle, where she is a student at the University of Washington.

The court reinstated a guilty verdict first handed down against Knox and Sollecito in 2009. The verdict was overturned in 2011, but Italy’s supreme court vacated that decision and sent the case back for the third trial in Florence.

“I just really hope that people try to understand that (when you have) overzealous prosecutors and when you have a biased investigation and coercive interrogation these things happen. And I’m not crazy,” Knox told GMA.

More in Local News

Man arrested after police find van full of drugs, cash and guns

An officer on patrol noticed a vehicle by itself in the middle of a WinCo parking lot at 2 a.m.

Jim Mathis, the Vietnam veteran whose Marysville garden was recently featured in The Herald, died Wednesday. Mathis, who suffered from PTSD and cancer, found solace in his beautiful garden. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Vietnam veteran Jim Mathis found peace in his garden

The Marysville man who served two tours died Wednesday after suffering from cancer and PTSD.

Smith Island habitat restoration cost to rise $1.2 million

The project is intended to increase survival rates for juvenile chinook salmon.

Add deputies and bump taxes a bit, executive proposes

Dave Somers’ Snohomish County budget proposal also would address traffic problems in neighborhoods.

County councilman proposes banning safe injection sites

Nate Nehring says county officials also should find “credible, long-term solutions to addiction.”

Car crashes near Everett after State Patrol pursuit

The driver and a second person in the car suffered injuries.

They chose the longshot candidate to fill a vacant seat

Sultan Mayor Carolyn Eslick will serve as representative for the 39th legislative district.

Alien brain? No, a colony of harmless freshwater creatures

Bryozoans are tiny invertebrates that live in jelly-like masses, and their presence is a good thing.

Definitely not Christmas in July for parched young trees

“I live in Washington. I should not have to water a Christmas tree,” says one grower. But they did.

Most Read