‘Apodment’ living isn’t for Snohomish, council says

SNOHOMISH — The debate over “apodments” is over, at least for now.

The Snohomish City Council voted 6-0 on Tuesday against a proposal to allow the compact housing style in single-family zones.

“Apodments” consist of several smaller apartments in a larger building with shared common rooms such as kitchens and laundry areas. Coho Real Estate of Seattle wanted to build the housing in a vacant building at 402 Ave. E near Snohomish High School.

“That kind of density isn’t appropriate in that area,” City Councilwoman Lynn Schilaty said. “We don’t have the mass transportation.”

Specifically, the City Council’s vote directed the staff to do no more work on the plan, Councilman Tom Hamilton said.

The council was acting on a previous recommendation from the city’s planning commission against allowing the rooming-house style residences, Schilaty said.

“We didn’t have much discussion on it,” she said. “By the time we got this motion (on Tuesday) we were all individually prepared to make our votes.”

Councilman Paul Kaftanski was absent but left behind a letter stating his opposition to the plans, council members said.

The planning board earlier this month voted 4-2 against each of two proposed ordinances that would have allowed the housing.

Planning commissioner Christine Wakefield Nichols said afterward that the apodments aren’t allowed under the city’s long-term plans and are opposed by residents.

That opposition was no small factor, council members said.

About 130 people attended the planning commission meeting, Hamilton said. Most spoke against the housing style.

“Citizens came together and organized very well and became part of the process, which was great,” he said.

Herald reporter Alejandro Dominguez contributed to this story.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; sheets@heraldnet.com.

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