‘Apodment’ living isn’t for Snohomish, council says

SNOHOMISH — The debate over “apodments” is over, at least for now.

The Snohomish City Council voted 6-0 on Tuesday against a proposal to allow the compact housing style in single-family zones.

“Apodments” consist of several smaller apartments in a larger building with shared common rooms such as kitchens and laundry areas. Coho Real Estate of Seattle wanted to build the housing in a vacant building at 402 Ave. E near Snohomish High School.

“That kind of density isn’t appropriate in that area,” City Councilwoman Lynn Schilaty said. “We don’t have the mass transportation.”

Specifically, the City Council’s vote directed the staff to do no more work on the plan, Councilman Tom Hamilton said.

The council was acting on a previous recommendation from the city’s planning commission against allowing the rooming-house style residences, Schilaty said.

“We didn’t have much discussion on it,” she said. “By the time we got this motion (on Tuesday) we were all individually prepared to make our votes.”

Councilman Paul Kaftanski was absent but left behind a letter stating his opposition to the plans, council members said.

The planning board earlier this month voted 4-2 against each of two proposed ordinances that would have allowed the housing.

Planning commissioner Christine Wakefield Nichols said afterward that the apodments aren’t allowed under the city’s long-term plans and are opposed by residents.

That opposition was no small factor, council members said.

About 130 people attended the planning commission meeting, Hamilton said. Most spoke against the housing style.

“Citizens came together and organized very well and became part of the process, which was great,” he said.

Herald reporter Alejandro Dominguez contributed to this story.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; sheets@heraldnet.com.

More in Local News

Man suspected of robbing Rite Aids

Mill Creek police released a sketch Monday evening of the suspect.

Police looking for Lynnwood bank robber

The robber did not flash a weapon to the teller at a U.S. Bank.

Here’s how much property taxes will rise to pay for schools

The owner of a $350,000 home is looking at a property-tax hike of nearly $300 this year.

Everett man accused of causing his baby’s brain damage

He told police he shook his son to get him to stop crying, and the boy slipped out of his hands.

At one point she dropped out; now she’s graduation-bound

Anita Bradford-Diaz has had her share of setbacks, but they only seem to increase her motivation.

Employee threats caused lockdown at Arlington elementary

Arlington Police said all students and staff were.

Residents are helping turn Casino Road in a new direction

An initiative backed by a $700,000 grant goes to the community for solutions to the area’s challenges.

With an immigrant’s help, kids reach out to Filipino children

Marysville students drew and sent portraits. Thanks to a video, they got to see the reaction.

Live in Edmonds? Hate speeders?

Edmonds has $35,000 to address local residents’ concerns about speeding in their… Continue reading

Most Read