Around the County

Arlington: Parks, library boards need volunteers

The city is looking for volunteers to fill a vacancy on the Parks, Arts and Recreation Commission and on the Library Board.

The parks commission provides support and advice to the mayor and City Council about parks, arts and recreation issues facing Arlington. The volunteer must live within the urban growth area of the city.

The commission consists of seven members, each serving a four-year term. The commission meets monthly on the fourth Tuesday of the month, in the Arlington City Council Chambers.

The Library Board consists of five members, each serving a five-year term. Meetings are held at 5:30 p.m. quarterly on Thursdays in the City Council Chambers, 110 E Third Street. Board members must be a resident of Arlington.

The board provides support and advice to the mayor and the City Council about library issues.

The board also represents the interests of the city by advising the Sno-Isle Regional Library System.

More info: 360-403-3441, www.arlingtonwa.gov or visit City Hall, 238 N Olympic Ave.

Island County: Marine resources board openings

As many as five seats on the Island County Marine Resources Committee will be open for new appointment or reappointment at the end of the year.

The Island County Board of Commissioners invites applicants from Whidbey and Camano islands to express interest and request appointment.

Members of this voluntary, advisory committee serve three-year terms. The 16-member committee meets on the first and third Tuesday afternoons of the month in Coupeville.

Applicants should provide a letter of interest and statement of qualifications by 4:30 p.m. Dec. 6.

More info: www.island countymrc.org or contact Tim Lawrence, the committee’s county lead and director of the Washington State University Extension, 360-679-7329 or timothy.lawrence@wsu.edu.

Mountlake Terrace: Budget maintains services, avoids layoffs

The City Council this week adopted its 2013-2014 biennial budget and the 2013 property tax ordinance.

The budget maintains services for residents at current levels and does not include layoffs or reductions in services.

The city will continue moving forward on many key fronts including economic development, Town Center, capital infrastructure improvements and a strategy that ensures financial stability and sustainability.

The council also adopted the 2013-2018 transportation plan. Due to the continued economic downturn, the city delayed or staggered implementation for many of the programs to reduce costs.

Projects that use grants, state or federal appropriations, funding partnerships and development impact fees have been maintained.

For more information about the budget or property taxes, call finance director Sonja Springer at 425-744-6204 or go to www. cityofmlt.com.

More info: Will VanRy, engineering services director, 425-744-6271

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