Bail at $500,000 for man who led long police chase

EVERETT — A Stanwood man accused of punching a deputy and leading police on a 10-hour manhunt last week near Warm Beach was ordered jailed Monday on $500,000 bail.

Duane Sanders, 29, has a history of drug use, violence and mental health issues, according to court records. He appeared briefly Monday in Everett District Court.

A Snohomish County sheriff’s deputy was in the Warm Beach area Friday morning to recover a stolen pickup found in the woods near 192nd Street NW, according to the arrest report. Sanders and a woman pulled up nearby about 11 a.m.

The deputy recognized Sanders from previous arrests. The deputy reportedly knew that Sanders used methamphetamine and had been in trouble before for warrants and for driving without a license.

Sanders has at least four felony convictions and 12 misdemeanors, nine of them for driving with his license suspended or revoked.

When confronted by the deputy, Sanders “acknowledged that his license was probably suspended,” the arrest report said.

While Sanders was being handcuffed, he allegedly began fighting with the deputy. Both men ended up on the ground, and Sanders ran into the woods with a handcuff on one wrist.

The deputy required stitches for cuts to his ear and his hand.

A manhunt in the area lasted well into Friday evening before Sanders’ parents dropped him off at the Snohomish County Jail to surrender.

Sanders served time in a state prison from June 2011 until February 2012 for a third-degree assault conviction out of Snohomish County, according to the Department of Corrections.

He’s been under community supervision ever since. In that time, he’s racked up eight corrections violations, all for failing to report or for using a controlled substance. His most recent warrant for failing to report was issued in April. He’s also been under corrections supervision two other times as an adult.

Sanders is classified as a high-violent, high-risk offender, court records show.

He was being held Monday at the Snohomish County Jail for investigation of third-degree assault. He also had warrants related to past offenses including failing to report to his corrections officer, violating a domestic-violence no-contact order, and dismantling vehicles without an auto-wrecker’s license. His felony convictions include burglary, attempted trafficking in stolen property and forgery.

In 2011, Sanders reported to court that he was unable to work due to his mental health conditions, including bipolar disorder. He said he spent most of his time working on cars at his parents’ property.

Sanders’ close friend, Michael Carter, was shot and killed in Everett in 2011 during a drug-related robbery.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449, rking@heraldnet.com.

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