Boeing unions oppose new water quality standards

SEATTLE — Unions representing Boeing machinists and mill workers are siding with businesses in a bitter fight over how much fish people eat, and thus how clean Washington state waters should be.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and others are worried that a new water quality standard being developed by the state would hurt jobs and economic development.

IAM spokeswoman Tanya Hutchins says workers want a reasonable proposal. They scheduled a news conference Monday in Olympia.

Tribes, environmental groups and others are pressing for rules that protect all people, particularly those who eat the most fish. Businesses and municipalities worry standards will be set so high they can’t be achieved.

The state has been deliberating for months. A draft rule is expected this summer.

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