Boy, 10, dies after he’s pulled from Stillaguamish River

ARLINGTON — A 10-year-old boy died Sunday after he was pulled from the Stillaguamish River in Arlington.

The boy was visiting the river with his family at Twin Rivers Park on Sunday afternoon. He was playing in the river without a life jacket and was swept downstream, said Lt. Rodney Rochon of the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

The Arlington boy was in the water for about an hour before he was found. He was taken to Cascade Valley Hospital in Arlington where he died, Rochon said.

“We’ve been saying this for years: If you’re going into moving water, wear a life jacket,” Rochon said at the scene.

The incident was reported at 3:54 p.m. Fire and rescue personnel from several nearby departments responded to Haller Park, just downstream from Twin Rivers.

The boy was spotted by crew aboard SnoHawk 1, a county sheriff’s helicopter, about a quarter-mile down the river among snags in the river. Divers from police hovercraft located the boy underwater nearly an hour after he was reported missing. The rescue point was about a half-mile from the road, so a bystander offered his four-wheel drive vehicle to crews to carry the boy out to an ambulance, Rochon said.

Earlier, people on four small inflatable boats drifted into the path of the hovercraft trying to find the boy, Rochon said.

“They made it harder for us to do our work,” he said.

Seven people on those boats were ticketed for not wearing life jackets and for not having a sound-making device, such as a whistle — both violations of state laws governing people on boats, Rochon said.

The fines totaled $174 for each person — $87 for not wearing life jackets and another $87 for not having a sound-making device.

“We want people to play, we want people to have fun, and we want them all to come home safely,” Rochon said.

Every year, several people drown in Snohomish County rivers, lakes and creeks, according to a pamphlet about river safety posted online by the Sheriff’s Office.

Rochon said people often think they are safe in a back eddy or other area where the water is calm. With cold, fast-moving water nearby, however, things can change quickly, he said.

“One slip and you’re gone,” he said.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; sheets@heraldnet.com.

More in Local News

Shock from WSU suicide ripples through Snohomish County

Roughly 1 in 10 seniors, sophomores and 8th-graders said they had attempted to take their own lives.

New leaders coming to county, state political parties

Hillary Moralez of Bothell takes over as chair for the Snohomish County Democratic Party.

$1,000 reward for info on who killed an eagle near Snohomish

After being shot, the raptor was treated at the Sarvey Wildlife Center but died overnight.

Possible bobcat sighting keeps Snohomish students inside

The creature was spotted on the campus of Valley View Middle School around noon.

Derrick “Wiz” Crawford, 22, is a suspect in the homicide of his roommate. (Edmonds Police Department)
Roommate suspected in Edmonds killing found hiding in closet

Police had been searching for him for 10 days before locating him at a house in Everett.

Stabbing in Everett follows dispute between brothers-in-law

The victim, 54, was hospitalized. The suspect, 29, had not been apprehended Thursday.

Camano Island man gets 18 years for role in drug ring

He was convicted of helping lead a drug distribution network in four Washington counties.

Lake Stevens man missing since beginning of January

Jason Michael Knox White hasn’t used his credit card or withdrawn money from his bank since then.

Snohomish County’s emergency radios are breaking down

A plan to convert to digital equipment is in the works with an estimated cost of up to $75 million.

Most Read