Boy, 10, dies after he’s pulled from Stillaguamish River

ARLINGTON — A 10-year-old boy died Sunday after he was pulled from the Stillaguamish River in Arlington.

The boy was visiting the river with his family at Twin Rivers Park on Sunday afternoon. He was playing in the river without a life jacket and was swept downstream, said Lt. Rodney Rochon of the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

The Arlington boy was in the water for about an hour before he was found. He was taken to Cascade Valley Hospital in Arlington where he died, Rochon said.

“We’ve been saying this for years: If you’re going into moving water, wear a life jacket,” Rochon said at the scene.

The incident was reported at 3:54 p.m. Fire and rescue personnel from several nearby departments responded to Haller Park, just downstream from Twin Rivers.

The boy was spotted by crew aboard SnoHawk 1, a county sheriff’s helicopter, about a quarter-mile down the river among snags in the river. Divers from police hovercraft located the boy underwater nearly an hour after he was reported missing. The rescue point was about a half-mile from the road, so a bystander offered his four-wheel drive vehicle to crews to carry the boy out to an ambulance, Rochon said.

Earlier, people on four small inflatable boats drifted into the path of the hovercraft trying to find the boy, Rochon said.

“They made it harder for us to do our work,” he said.

Seven people on those boats were ticketed for not wearing life jackets and for not having a sound-making device, such as a whistle — both violations of state laws governing people on boats, Rochon said.

The fines totaled $174 for each person — $87 for not wearing life jackets and another $87 for not having a sound-making device.

“We want people to play, we want people to have fun, and we want them all to come home safely,” Rochon said.

Every year, several people drown in Snohomish County rivers, lakes and creeks, according to a pamphlet about river safety posted online by the Sheriff’s Office.

Rochon said people often think they are safe in a back eddy or other area where the water is calm. With cold, fast-moving water nearby, however, things can change quickly, he said.

“One slip and you’re gone,” he said.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439;

More in Local News

Mom gives her $25,000 windfall to Marysville high schools

Among the beneficiaries is the drama club, which gets much-needed audio equipment.

Why Republican legislators voted against a property tax cut

You’ll no doubt be hearing about it in campaign ads next fall.

Driver hospitalized after I-5 rollover crash near Arlington

A medical problem is believed to have caused the accident.

Man struck, killed by Everett Transit bus Friday night

He was in the roadway between 75th Street SE and Beverly Boulevard when he was hit, police said.

Sky Valley honors its own

Civic and nonprofit groups in Sultan, Gold Bar, Index and Skykomish gather to recognize volunteers.

Rotary Club of Everett honors outstanding seniors

The Rotary Club of Everett honored its February Students of the Month:… Continue reading

ORCA places third at Orca Bowl

A team from Everett Community College’s Ocean Research College Academy (ORCA) for… Continue reading

Edmonds man gets prison for Navy cadet program embezzlement

Michael Leighton, 49, also must pay over $75,000 in restitution.

New books donated to Edmonds schools highlight diversity

The Edmonds Diversity Commission donated children’s books to local elementary schools that… Continue reading

Most Read