Burn ban in effect for Snohomish, Pierce counties

A burn ban in Snohomish and Pierce counties was put into effect at 5 p.m. todayby the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency.

The weather is forecast to dry out and turn colder, creating more stagnant conditions. Air pollution is expected to build up to levels that are unhealthy for sensitive groups, especially in communities were wood-burning stoves are common. The ban will stay in effect until weather conditions change.

No burning is allowed in fireplaces or uncertified wood stoves. Residents should rely instead on their home’s other, cleaner source of heat (such as furnaces or electric baseboard heaters) for a few days until air quality improves and the ban is canceled, according to the Clean Air Agency. The only exception is if a wood stove is a home’s only adequate source of heat.

No outdoor fires are allowed. This includes recreational fires such as bonfires, campfires and the use of fire pits and chimineas.

Burn ban violations are subject to a $1,000 penalty.

It is OK to use natural gas, propane, pellet and certified wood stoves or inserts during the ban.

For more information, go to www.pscleanair.org.

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