Cold snap transition forecast in Washington

SEATTLE — Forecasters say the cold snap that started December in Washington should give way this week to more-normal cloudy-rainy weather with a chance of light snow in places during the transition.

The National Weather Service says the change begins Monday in Western Washington with warmer, moist air riding over the cold air mass. That could result in snow, but accumulations should be less than an inch. Freezing drizzle is possible Tuesday before turning to light rain. High temperatures should rise into the 40s with lows in the 30s.

Temperatures are expected to remain below freezing in Eastern Washington this week with a chance of snow or light freezing rain.

Some low temperatures early Monday: 24 at Sea-Tac Airport, 17 in Olympia, 7 in Spokane, 3 in Yakima and zero at Pullman.

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