County aims to snuff out knotweed in waterways

EVERETT — A program getting under way this summer aims to eradicate invasive Japanese knotweed from the banks of the Pilchuck River.

Snohomish County’s Noxious Weed Control Board plans to perform the work with the help from state and federal grants. The goal is to start near the river’s headwaters near Spada Lake, then move south past Granite Falls, Lake Stevens and Snohomish, until reaching the Snohomish River.

“If you live or own property on the Pilchuck River or any of its tributaries, if you have seen this plant, or if you would like to schedule a field visit, contact us,” said Sonny Gohrman, the county’s noxious weed coordinator.

From now until September, the noxious weed board will be seeking river access to survey and control the invasive plant, at no cost to landowners.

The county’s noxious weed board received a $20,000 state Department of Agriculture grant for surveying, Gohrman said. Another state grant for the same amount is expected next month. An additional $10,000 in county Surface Water Management dollars is dedicated for knotweed removal in the Stillaguamish River, Little Bear Creek and Pilchuck River basins as needed.

The state Department of Ecology also is providing a Conservation Corps crew for some of the surveying and removal work.

Knotweed sprouts from stems and roots. It can clog small waterways and displace native vegetation. That can lead to bank erosion, flooding, and destruction of fish and wildlife habitat.

Japanese knotweed and related plants are native to Asia. They were introduced to the United States in the late 1800s as ornamentals. Common names include Mexican or Japanese bamboo, elephant ear and fleeceflower.

For more information, or to schedule a visit, call 425-388-7534; or write to Janice Martin, the county’s noxious weed inspector, at janice.martin@snoco.org; or to Gohrman at sonny.gohrman@snoco.org.

More in Local News

Mill Creek councilman no longer lives in city, panel finds

The Canvassing Board determined Sean Kelly is not eligible to vote there.

A Democrat and ex-Republican team up to end two-party politics

Brian Baird and Chris Vance unveil a new organization called Washington Independents.

The beavers weren’t happy, either, about Mill Creek flooding

A tree fell on their dam, sending a rush of water into a neighborhood near Jackson High School.

Granite Falls names Success in Education winners

The Granite Falls School District announced its first quarter Success in Education… Continue reading

Alderwood-Terrace Rotary hands out Educator of the Month honors

The Rotary Club of Alderwood-Terrace awarded its October Educators of the Month.… Continue reading

Schools honor service members for Veterans Day

Schools across Snohomish County honored veterans leading up to the Nov. 11… Continue reading

Yes to turn signal — eventually

Adding a right-turn signal at 112th St. and 7th Ave. is turning out to be a bit more complicated.

Hard work is paying off for Mariner High senior

Mey Ly has excelled in school since moving here from Cambodia; she also serves as an intrepreter.

Front Porch

EVENTS Music for kids from 3 to 103 The nonprofit Everett Philharmonic… Continue reading

Most Read