County cleans up after sudden deluge

EVERETT — A heavy rainstorm on Thursday evening left parts of Snohomish County still water-logged Friday.

The Everett office of the American Red Cross was flooded with more than five inches of water, a spokesman said. Red Cross officials on Friday were working on cleanup. Some classes and programs were being canceled or rescheduled.

Services for people with emergency needs shouldn’t be affected, Executive Director Chuck Morrison said.

Between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. Thursday, Everett firefighters received 34 calls for help regarding urban flooding, collisions and other storm-related issues, city spokeswoman Meghan Pembroke said.

Everett’s public works department received more than 30 reports of flooded basements, spokeswoman Marla Carter said. Crews also were dealing with some sewer overflow.

On Friday, they were posting signs at city-owned beaches warning people not to swim or wade in the water. That included Howarth Park, Pigeon Creek Beach, Langus Park, Rotary Park and Jetty Island.

The signs will stay up until the water’s safe again. That could take a couple of days, Carter said.

The city also notified the state health and ecology departments, the Snohomish Health District and Port of Everett about the spill, she said.

About 2,000 people were without power for a spell, mostly near Edmonds and Stanwood, according to the Snohomish County Public Utility District.

“Downtown Edmonds got hammered by that storm,” said Leslie Hynes, spokeswoman for Snohomish County Fire District 1.

The storm drains got overwhelmed, and manhole-covers started popping out of the ground, Hynes said.

Edmonds-area firefighters got more than 20 calls between 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m., mostly for flooding and some downed wires, she said. One commercial building in the 100 block of Sunset Avenue S. was evacuated due to a partial roof collapse. A store owner there reported hundreds of gallons of water inside the building, Hynes said.

In Mukilteo, up to a foot of flooding was reported in some homes and garages, especially in the lower Harbour Pointe and Old Town neighborhoods, according to the fire department.

Some ditches in rural areas spilled over, but no major flooding was reported in unincorporated parts of the county, officials said.

Lynnwood and Monroe streets also fared fairly well, though Thursday proved soggy for fairgoers.

Some flooding was reported at the Boeing plant in Everett, a spokesman said Friday. Operations were back to normal about an hour later, he said. The National Weather Service predicted a sunny Labor Day Weekend for the Everett area. The local gauges that monitor county river levels also looked good to go on Friday.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449, rking@heraldnet.com.

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