Delta’s clothing minstry has aided many for 30 years

EVERETT — The morning was cold and foggy, with a nippy temperature of about 45 degrees.

The weather probably helped urge dozens of people into thinking it was the right time to stock up their wardrobes and get ready for the winter.

At the Delta Community Baptist Church, they found clothes for everyone in the family: toddlers, babies, women and men. There were racks of jackets, pants, socks, shoes and boots.

The clothing giveaway for people in need continues at 9 a.m. today at the church, 98201 16th St. The doors are open until 2 p.m.

The community clothing ministry of Delta Church, called Delta Door, usually holds the event three times a year, and has offered it for more than 30 years.

Between 150 and 200 people turn out. The church spreads the word by posting fliers in stores and other public places in English, Spanish, Arabic, Vietnamese and Russian.

Judy Keys marvels at how the program has grown since the beginning.

It started in the church’s basement. Today, they have the whole Delta Community Center and work with around 20 volunteers and six permanent workers.

“We have plenty of clothes and accessories. People sign up on the list and take a white plastic bag to serve themselves” explained Dolores DeMonbrun, the event manager.

The church skipped one of the giveaways this year.

“We didn’t plan any free clothes events these last five months because of what was going on at the church,” said Lee Bernethy, another staff member. She explained that the church was busy raising funds for the Community Center, which still needs water and a heating system.

But the team has mostly decided a date for its next event, the third Friday and Saturday of January, if the weather isn’t too cold.

Delta Door is also looking for helping hands.

“This is a lot of work, not only these two days but also the past two weeks. We’re always looking for new volunteers,” said volunteer George Lawrence. As for donations, the biggest need is for men’s clothes.

Michael, who works on a boat in Alaska, was glad to find jackets and pants. He didn’t have many clothes right now, he said.

A family came by right after school. A 7-year-old girl and her 9-year-old brother didn’t waste time choosing some toys and stuffed teddy bears. The family left with clothes, a children’s book and a notebook.

Some costumes hung on racks at the entrance. There was a Spartan helmet, a pumpkin jacket and sparkly sweatshirts.

“These can make kids happy,” said Elsie LaBorde, a Delta Door staffer.

“We`re trying to do God’s work in the neighborhood,” Lee said.

How to help

For more information on the clothing giveaway, or to donate, go to www.deltaeverett.org or call Dolores DeMonbrun at 425-252-1782.

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