Department of Ecology reduces fine for Everett company

EVERETT — An Everett metal finisher will pay a reduced fine of $24,000 after taking measures to improve the handling of toxic chemicals, according to the state.

Blue Streak Finishers, at 1520 80th St. SW, was fined $60,000 last fall by the state Department of Ecology after inspections revealed several violations of state law in the company’s handling of waste.

That included a discharge of dye penetrant into the sewer system; tossing unused paint in with regular garbage; failure to designate, identify and properly handle paint and other chemicals; and lack of proper testing, labeling and inspection of waste storage tanks.

If any of the violations are repeated within two years, the company will have to pay another $25,000 for a total of $49,000, said Daylin Davidson, a hazardous waste compliance officer for the Ecology Department. Of the original fine, $11,000 was waived.

The department and the company reached an agreement after the firm addressed most of the violations and took other measures, including starting a training program for employees in handling dangerous waste. The company still needs to install new, improved storage tanks, Davidson said.

“Ecology and Blue Streak each avoid expensive litigation with this settlement, which benefits Washington’s environment overall,” said K Seiler, who manages the Ecology department’s hazardous waste and toxics reduction program.

The state could have fined the business $166,000 for duplicate violations in different production areas observed during three inspections, officials said. State law allows a maximum fine of $10,000 per violation per day.

The company finishes metal parts for aircraft and other uses, said Reginald Booker, vice president of operations for the company.

He said he was hired last August in part to correct the way the company complies with environmental laws.

“I walked in to correct this matter, for that purpose and overall operations,” he said. “We’re doing business a little bit differently.”

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; bsheets@heraldnet.com.

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