Everett art project leaves lasting impressions

EVERETT — Schack Art Center’s studios were rockin’ and rollin’ on Friday.

It wasn’t just about the music playing loudly or the people dancing and laughing.

The third annual Ink Stomp invited its participants to roll skateboards, tricycles, scooters, cans and bamboo logs over ink-soaked paper to make giant abstract monoprints.

Teens from Lynnwood High School’s life skills class and young adults with the Everett-based All Aboard special needs program took part in the group art project.

Sponsored by the Schack center, the Everett Cultural Arts Commission, Alderwood Community Church’s visual arts ministry and Countryman Signs, the event produced a variety of black, yellow and blue prints that are to be displayed at the art center until Oct. 31.

Plexiglas plates covered with ink were placed on the studio floor and then large pieces of paper were laid over the ink.

Mike Rouoway, 30, danced atop the paper with his All Aboard art teacher Shannon Danks.

“It looks great,” said Rouoway when he saw how his footprints changed the print’s patterns.

Danks thought so, too.

“Anybody can do this,” she said. “There is no wrong way to make this art. Plus, we have all fun people doing it.”

Cristian Benitez, 17, a senior at Lynnwood High, said he enjoyed stomping on the ink.

“It’s a really cool project,” Cristian said. “We have a lot of fun when we come to the Schack.”

More in Local News

These little piggies stay home

Norman, who was spotted last week in Everett, is part of a trio kept as pets by the “pig whisperer.”

Sailors await to disembark the U.S.S. Kidd on Sunday morning at Naval Station Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Cheering families welcome Kidd, Shoup after 6 months at sea

“I get back Daddy back today,” said one homemade sign at Naval Station Everett.

Stanwood man, 33, killed in crash near Marysville

Speed may have been a factor, the sheriff’s department said.

Street-legal ATVs approved for some roads near Sultan

Supporters foresee tourism benefits. Opponents are concerned about injury and pollution risks.

Jamie Copeland is a senior at Cedar Park Christian Schools’ Mountlake Terrace campus. She is a basketball player, ASB president, cheerleader and, of course, a Lion. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Cedar Park Christian senior stepping up to new challenges

Jamie Copeland’s academics include STEM studies, leadership, ASB activities, honor society.

Woman, 47, found dead in Marysville jail cell

She’d been in custody about four days after being arrested on warrants, police said.

County plans to sue to recoup costs from ballot drop-box law

A quarter-million dollars could be spent adding 19 ballot boxes in rural areas.

Herald photos of the week

A weekly collection of The Herald’s top images by staff photographers and… Continue reading

Mukilteo Police Chief Cheol Kang is known for his people skills

The city’s top cop’s calm demeanor and holistic approach earns him the nickname “Yoda.”

Most Read