Everett indoor farmers market project moving along

EVERETT — A groundbreaking for a long-anticipated indoor farmers market on the west side of downtown is scheduled for Tuesday morning.

In addition to an agriculture hub, the Pagoda Village project also aims to bring a hotel, 220 luxury apartments and a public plaza.

Everett developer Lobsang Dargey said the market should be ready to open next year.

“This has been planned for many years,” he said Monday.

Before construction can begin, crews will need a few months to prep existing buildings for demolition, then tear them down.

Snohomish County and Everett city leaders are expected to attend an 11 a.m. ceremony at the site, which occupies much of Grand Avenue between Wall Street and Hewitt Avenue.

Path America, a company founded by Dargey, is developing the project. The firm relies on foreign investments through a government-sponsored program designed to create local jobs.

City and county officials since at least 2011 have been strong advocates of the year-round farmers market, which they have touted as a boost for local agricultural businesses. They initially predicted it would be ready by spring 2012.

The farmers market is the second phase of the project.

Excavation has been underway since summer on the first phase, a 110-unit Hampton Inn.

The final phase involves luxury apartments.

“The housing we’re providing is going to be very high-end,” Dargey said.

The total cost for building Pagoda Village is expected to be $53 million. Dargey said the Everett project will be the model for similar Pagoda Village complexes he wants to build elsewhere in the region.

Dargey also owns Potala Village on Rucker and Pacific avenues and the Everett Public Market Building on Grand Avenue.

Noah Haglund: 425-339-3465, nhaglund@heraldnet.com.

More in Local News

Residents are helping turn Casino Road in a new direction

An initiative backed by a $700,000 grant goes to the community for solutions to the area’s challenges.

Live in Edmonds? Hate speeders?

Edmonds has $35,000 to address local residents’ concerns about speeding in their… Continue reading

Marysville quits fire-department merger talks

Mayor Jon Nehring notified Arlington of the decision in a letter dated Jan. 10.

Everett marchers: ‘There’s too much to protest’ for one sign

About 150 people joined the “March to Impeach” from the waterfront to a county courthouse rally.

Legislation to limit opioid prescriptions under debate

Inslee also has requested a bill that prioritizes medication-assisted treatment for addiction.

Sirens! Flashing lights! — Move over!

We are a confident bunch on what to do when we hear… Continue reading

Herald photos of the week

A weekly collection of The Herald’s top images by staff photographers and… Continue reading

Judge: Lawmakers’ emails, texts subject to public disclosure

News organizations had sued to challenge the Legislature’s claim that members were exempt.

Hunter Standley, 6, scoots backward into a cozy cubbyhole in Wee Fit’s sensory room while holding an artificial aquarium. Hunter, who has autism, is with his mom, Breanna Standley, 25, and his grandmother, Barbara Bambrick, 63. They are all from Tulalip. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Family sets feast for the senses

Wee Fit is a new sensory play space in Everett for children on the autism spectrum.

Most Read