Everett school levy passing, bond measure in doubt

Approval of major school bond issues in Everett and Lakewood were in question Tuesday night, while similar measures in Edmonds and Mukilteo seemed to be passing.

The results were part of ballot measures for operating levies or bond issues in school districts throughout Snohomish County.

Everett’s regular operation levy appeared to be passing. But it was unclear if a proposed $259 million bond issue for a new high school, elementary school and a major upgrade to North Middle School would pass.

The bond had 56 percent approval but requires a 60 percent yes vote for passage. Levies are approved by a simple majority.

Pam LeSesne, Everett School Board president, said she was grateful to the community for support of the district’s operating levy, which provides about 20 percent of its operating budget.

The bond issue was designed in part to relieve overcrowding at schools, she said. “The need doesn’t go away,” she added.

Lakewood’s request for a $66.8 million bond issue for improvements to its high school and other improvements also was in question, with 57 percent approval. Again, a 60 percent yes vote is required.

Some 383,000 ballots were mailed out to voters. Tuesday night’s tallies included results from 79,572 voters, which is about a 21 percent turnout. Ballots that had to be postmarked no later than Tuesday will trickle in this week, and results could change.

Edmonds had asked voters to approve both an operations levy and a $259 million bond issue for projects to replace three schools. The levy appeared to be passing and the bond issue was narrowly winning.

Marysville asked for a maintenance and operations levy as well as a technology levy that would pay for wide-ranging improvements, including districtwide Wi-Fi and installation of security cameras at each of the district’s 22 schools. Both measures appeared headed for approval.

Mukilteo’s maintenance and operations levy was winning, and a $119 million bond issue to pay for projects such as a new building where all the district’s kindergarten students would be taught and a new elementary school seemed headed toward approval.

Other ballot measures included:

Darrington: A maintenance and operations levy was winning.

Granite Falls: An operations levy as well as a technology and school improvements levy were passing.

Lake Stevens: An operations levy and a technology levy appeared to have the needed yes votes to pass.

Monroe: A maintenance and operations levy and a technology levy seemed to be passing.

Northshore: An operations levy was passing, and a $177 million bond issue to build a new high school seemed to be headed for approval.

Snohomish: An operations levy and a technology levy appeared to be passing.

Sultan: A maintenance and operations levy appeared to be passing.

The Snohomish County districts of Index, Stanwood and Arlington did not have measures on the ballot.

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com

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